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  1. #481
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    Just wondering if anyone has done or thought of doing a Lactation Consultant course or an ABA councellor? im thinking of doing either of these. just wanted to see what everyone else thinks.

    Thanks. so looking forward to starting my bach nursing at the end of the month

  2. #482
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cathyboyan4 View Post
    Just wondering if anyone has done or thought of doing a Lactation Consultant course or an ABA councellor? im thinking of doing either of these. just wanted to see what everyone else thinks.

    Thanks. so looking forward to starting my bach nursing at the end of the month
    im pretty sure to be eligible to start the training for lactation consultant you need to have experience in a paid role working with mothers and babies (midwife for eg or child health nurse) whereas aba counsellor are women who have has babies and want to volunteer?

    The training for them are completely different as well.

  3. #483
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    Thanks for weighing in on the RM/RN issue spice and wannabe. It is interesting to hear your experiences out on the wards, and I'm glad that there doesn't seem to be resentment from the dual qualified staff towards the BMid staff. The point you both made about women presenting with different medical conditions is a good one and definitely one I'll be taking on board as I progress through my studies.

    Just wanted to comment on this:

    Quote Originally Posted by spice View Post
    Keep in mind there is a culture shift occurring. Come 5-10 years time RM's without RN qualifications will be the norm. There are reasons why the uni's are phasing in BMid degrees and phasing out post grad mid diplomas etc.
    See, this did seem to be the thing a few years ago, and heaven knows the ACM and a lot of midwives out there are continuing to push this. But I do find it interesting that some unis out there that have previously had BMids have dropped them (either altogether, or in favour of reinstating the dual degree - RHJ's uni being one). Many unis also seem to be hanging onto their postgrad mid diploma programs too. I think in 5 - 10 years there will be so many more BMid qualified (Australian!) midwives out there so it will be much more normal, but I think it will still be pretty common to have the dual qualification too.

  4. #484
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    Originally Posted by Cathyboyan4

    Just wondering if anyone has done or thought of doing a Lactation Consultant course or an ABA councellor? im thinking of doing either of these. just wanted to see what everyone else thinks.
    I am involved with the ABA - if you want to know more about the training, either head to the forum on the ABA website and have a sticky beak in the relevant section, or you can PM me. Becoming an IBCLC (lactation consultant) is a very intense path, and is generally not something that someone who is pre-nursing would be eligible to complete - check out the IBLC website for details.


    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    im pretty sure to be eligible to start the training for lactation consultant you need to have experience in a paid role working with mothers and babies (midwife for eg or child health nurse) whereas aba counsellor are women who have has babies and want to volunteer?

    The training for them are completely different as well.
    You are right here, although strictly speaking you don't have to be a midwife or CHN - it is just that generally they are. To be eligible to sit the IBLC exam, you need to have a certain amount of tertiary study in the area of infant/maternal phsyiology behind you, and you need to have a certain number of documented hours of working with childbearing women (I can't remember off the top of my head, but something like 1000 hours rings a bell???). So, midwives and CHNs obviously can demonstrate this most easily.

    However, among the ABA counsellors, there are definitely non-midwives who are also IBCLCs - including dietitians, GPs, naturopaths and a few others. (I know of one who did some relevant units from a science degree). And the counselling that ABA counsellors do can count towards the hours needed to become an IBCLC.

    The training is very different, but that said, the training for the ABA counsellors is also very good. The first person to ever get 100% on the notoriously difficult IBCLC exam was an ABA counsellor. There are many counsellors who know more about human lactation and supporting women than a lot of midwives and paeds out there, sad as it is!

    ** Just want to clarify that I don't speak for the ABA here, and what I've shared is just what I seen as a consumer of ABA services and as a member. I do know that the ABA is very serious about wanting to work cooperatively with health professionals and would never diss them for having outdated info etc, so I hope my last comment isn't taken that way at all... **
    Last edited by Parksider; 02-01-2013 at 10:38. Reason: Clarifying my position

  5. #485
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    Replying to Parksider - I don't think the we'll have a majority of midwife only in Australia..... The tertiary hospital I did prac at did, as we would have 10 midwives staffing the ward alone and we never got outliers because med/surg/gynae wards were large enough and just as well staffed so you could have a larger number of RM only on the staff. The regional hospital I'm at now the gynae ward has closed for Xmas/new year so there are no elective procedures booked but we've gotten all their emergency cases. Private hospitals often have combined maternity/gynae wards and I know there were a couple of hospitals I couldn't apply to for a midwife position because I wasn't dual qualified. My friend who is working in an outback hospital (not a small one) they can only employ one RM only because when maternity is empty they can't redeploy her to another ward.

    The Grad Dip seems to be getting phased out with a Masters of Mid getting phased in which is 18 months and is moving towards non-paid positions for placement and will be supernumerary like the undergrad placement positions and not to be confused with the Master of Mid that other uni's have which is for already qualified RM's to upgrade their skills etc.

    I don't the BMid is a bad thing, I think even though we did do major medical conditions affecting pregnancy and drugs etc some more knowledge on other medical conditions that people might have like influenza/pneumonia etc. Sometimes I think we spent too much time focusing on natural things and holistic (which isn't a bad thing) but unless your lucky to get a position in a continuity of care program, your going to be completely unprepared for the reality of hospital midwifery. I know I was taught the mindset of epidurals are bad etc and then really struggled with the concept that someone has the right to whatever pain relief they need etc if that makes sense.

  6. #486
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    My Uni only dropped the BMID out of cost. It cost a lot more for them apparently for them to place us than nursing students, and that I believe is the overall reason it was dropped. APRHA who came to evaluate the new degree were incredibly disappointed at the unis decision.
    I think a good mix of midwives, no matter their pathway is important. Double degreers, Postgrad and direct entry are important. I think that having one as a majority breeds a culture that one is better than the other, which is untrue! Ultimately we are all registered midwives, and that is what is important, not so much the path in which we went to get there. All the courses are approved to make sure that we are capable of caring for pregnant women, with additional illnesses or otherwise.

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    Hi all, i partiipated in this thread last year before starting BMid at Vic Uni Melbourne, I've just finished year 1.
    I have just moved to the Gold Coast! So this has unfortunately stuffed up my study. I have had to exit from Vic Uni and re apply through QTAC to start again up here - I can't transfer as the curriculams aren't close enough as far as I know but I have been told a few times usually once you get in you sit down and chat with the course co ordinater to sort out what I may be able to do to fast track through year 1. I love Midwifery so much, I receieved all D's and HD's 1st year and I really want to continue studying but now I'm soooooo nervous because I've noticed many of you have recieved early offers and I haven't heard anythig yet Are early offers for mature age usually, and major offer round (17th jan) for school leavers? I just feel like I musn't have got in?? I've applied for southern cross, GU and ACU.
    Any thoughts??
    P.S Congrats to RHM pn graduating!! It ws because of you and your wise words that I got in last year. You are so caring and supportive you're going to make an amazing midwife xx
    Last edited by parentingrocks; 02-01-2013 at 19:35.

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  9. #488
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    Default 2012 Nursing and Midwifery students chat

    Has anyone completed their nursing diploma at the Holy Spirit north side private hospital (chermside, qld)? What was your experience like there?

  10. #489
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    Default 2012 Nursing and Midwifery students chat

    Park sider, why don't you call the program convenor for BMid and chat to her about your concerns? Are you thinking of going rural? Also if you're thinking GU don't forget you will be at the same hospital for the whole degree (roughly 2 rostered shifts every week for the majority of the degree except for the first semester) and as your skills build you will get plenty of exposure to variables. Also you could always look at post grad nursing after you do BMid if your passion lies with midwifery

  11. #490
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    Default 2012 Nursing and Midwifery students chat

    Parenting rocks call QTAC and see where your application is at! Maybe it just wasn't complete in time for early offers. Good luck!


 

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