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  1. #471
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    Default Re: 2012 Nursing and Midwifery students chat

    Onelove, you could look at doing the diploma of nursing. This will give you enough credit to wipe almost the first year of the bachelor of nursing.

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    Harvestmoon, that did cross my mind. I don't think it's the way I'd go though. Ideally it would be good to enrol in Bach. Nursing via distance perhaps and do the A&P subject perhaps. only if it would be credited by whatever Uni I then go to the following year... might have to check that.

    Does anyone know more about going this way?

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    Quote Originally Posted by OneLove View Post
    Hello lovely ladies,

    I was wondering if I could pick you brains!?!

    I have been looking at studying Midwifery for a couple of years now (have posted in this thread before) last year I was accepted but ended up turning it down as I suffered a miscarriage and didn't feel I was in the right place.

    This year has been an exact repeat of last year

    Anyway...

    I have been considering options in the meantime. I have been told that I would be wise to study both Nursing and Midwifery and not the Midwifery alone. I am wondering what others think about this...

    I am uncertain as to how I will go with nursing. I feel there would be parts I would really enjoy but also am worried I won't like other aspects. Obviously it opens up more employment opportunities. As in if there were no midwifery jobs I could go for a nursing position and who knows, maybe I'll really love nursing.... but my real passion would be for Midwifery and I wouldn't want to be overlooked for those jobs if I do the duel degree. Are you more employable as a Nurse/midwife or are those who do straight midwifery favoured generally?

    I'm considering the UQ Bach Nurse/midwifery course. Anyone studying there? How is it?
    Heya!!! I did UQ's BMid course and graduated in July (so feel free to PM me any questions!) and started my first RM job about a month ago 2000km away!!!

    So far.... I've quite enjoyed not being able to be allocated the surg/med outliers on the ward (we have a few at the moment). A lot of my women have co-exisiting medical problems such as uncontrolled diabetes, heart disease, epilepsy, mental health problems and I have felt a little bit behind when it came to caring for their MEDICAL issues but was fine with their postnatal obstetric issues. I've just looked up any drugs in MIMS if I didn't know what they were before I have them - theres been a few funky drugs in there hehe) and read the chart throughly as theres always a plan from the doctors regarding their condition and have followed that which is usually in regard to how frequent they want obs, what obs they want and what limits they want to be notified about and just ask if I have any questions or clarification which I'm usually doing for obstetric issues anyway.

    I don't think you can go wrong either way, But things will all change job-wise in the next 3-5 years anyway, so who knows what the situation will be like when you're done.

  4. #474
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    Hi OneLove,

    Firstly, I'm really sorry to hear of your losses. Your story is very similar to mine, with feeling called to midwifery, but also wanting another child, going on to lose that child, and then being in the wrong space to event think about midwifery, then wanting to study but missing the cut-off. I remember feeling completely out of control of my own life at that time. I hope you are doing ok. I think it's great that you're investigating alternate options. In my case, I did end up going on to have another child after that loss, and I will be starting my BMid in 2013. I searched high and low for study I could do via distance in 2012 to gear me up for studying the BMid, and hopefully, count for credit towards the course. Unforunately, I didn't find a lot. I did end up doing some related study which I am hoping will eventually complement my BMid and help my future career plans - feel free to PM me if you are interested and I'll let you know what happened. It is definitely not for everyone though.

    Good luck with everything, and I hope 2013 is full of peace, progress and happiness for you.

    wannawannabe, it is great to hear how you are going in your new job. I was sorry to read a few pages back that you had some hiccups starting, and I hope you're feeling a bit more settled now. Thanks for your insights on working as a BMid-only qualified RM - it is really interesting. Do your colleagues who are both RNs and RMs ever feel resentful that you cannot be allocated any of the med/surg patients that overflow onto your ward?

    Also (sorry for the 20 questions!), are there many other RMs in your hospital with only their BMid, or are they mostly dual-qualified (whether through the dual degree or the "old fashioned" post grad qual)? What do they think of the BMidders?

    If you had the choice again, would you stick with the BMid, or would you do a dual degree?

    I'm starting to get cold feet about starting my BMid a month's time, and keep wondering whether I should have gone for the dual instead. I realise I could switch after a year if I still feel that way, but a switch would entail changing unis and it could get messy...

    Oh, one more question if you don't mind - do you rotate around in your job, or are you on the ward only?

    RHJ and Brunfelsia, I hope you guys are enjoying your holidays before starting your new jobs!!!

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Parksider For This Useful Post:

    Brunfelsia Dreaming  (01-01-2013),RHJ  (31-12-2012)

  6. #475
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    Default 2012 Nursing and Midwifery students chat

    Just to put in my 2c regarding doing RN then postgrad mid versus a BMid degree. Keep in mind there is a culture shift occurring. Come 5-10 years time RM's without RN qualifications will be the norm. There are reasons why the uni's are phasing in BMid degrees and phasing out post grad mid diplomas etc. There is a bit of a stigma about " how could a bmid midwife possibly be as competant as a post grad midwife but the BMid courses are very comprehensive and I can only speak for my uni (GU) but we learn things like canulation, venepuncture and perineal suturing as a standard part of our degree and there are many existing midwives who have dual RN/RM qualifications who have never learnt canulation or suturing. Just something to think about

  7. #476
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    Quote Originally Posted by Parksider View Post
    wannawannabe, it is great to hear how you are going in your new job. I was sorry to read a few pages back that you had some hiccups starting, and I hope you're feeling a bit more settled now. Thanks for your insights on working as a BMid-only qualified RM - it is really interesting. Do your colleagues who are both RNs and RMs ever feel resentful that you cannot be allocated any of the med/surg patients that overflow onto your ward?

    Also (sorry for the 20 questions!), are there many other RMs in your hospital with only their BMid, or are they mostly dual-qualified (whether through the dual degree or the "old fashioned" post grad qual)? What do they think of the BMidders?

    If you had the choice again, would you stick with the BMid, or would you do a dual degree?

    I'm starting to get cold feet about starting my BMid a month's time, and keep wondering whether I should have gone for the dual instead. I realise I could switch after a year if I still feel that way, but a switch would entail changing unis and it could get messy...

    Oh, one more question if you don't mind - do you rotate around in your job, or are you on the ward only?
    !
    Hello!!!!! I believe I am the only direct-entry Australian Midwife working at the hospital. Someone mentioned the other day that a few other midwives were from the UK and we're possibly RM only as well. That said the closest direct-entry program is 2000km away, so they know that there is the option to go direct-entry for mid, but as all the programs are in Brisbane the majority of the graduates have stayed in SEQ as opposed to spreading out and taking over the rest of the state hehe.

    Noone has resented me or anything for not being able to take the med/surg outliers (secretly I think they wish they could say no as well as some of them haven't worked as a nurse for 10+ years so are a bit out of practice), but tbh it's a maternity ward - we have brand new babies with us, should we be really getting "sick people" in there? No one's really got an opinion about the BMid and if they do, they haven't said it to my face. I'm also the youngest midwife there by a couple of years as well. (I like to make life interesting for myself hehehe). But really I am a registered midwife just like everyone else and I was hired by the hospital. If the managers who hired me didn't think I could do the job, then they wouldn't have given me the job you know?

    I would make sure that the BMid program you do covers thoroughly drugs (so not just the basic ones midwifery uses, but other antibiotics and medications that people might be taking for pre-exisitng cardiac conditions, epilepsy, mental illnesses etc) as well as covering pre-exisiting medical conditions and how they effect pregnancy, labour, and postnatal.

    I had a lady today that I thought was going to be the undoing of me and be prime example of why you should have a nursing degree as well. Day 2 post c/s but had a pre-existing chest infection and didn't want to cough because it hurt her wound so was getting short of breath, sats dropping, wheezing, tachycardic and I ended up doing funky stuff with saline nebulisers and iv antibiotics and vasodilators and felt a bit out of my scope of practice with her because her main issues were medical not obstetric. But I clarified with another midwife that I'd done everything properly and I had, so felt better after that and will know what to do next time someone has a horrible cough.

    I think as long as your covering major medical conditions and how they're treated, because you will get sick people having babies. There will be people with cardiac conditions, and epilepsy and pneumonia and god knows what else who will come in and have a baby but their primary issue will be a medical issue but they still put on maternity because they're pregnant.

    I'm doing a "post-registration experience program" which isn't a grad program, I have no extra support/education but am doing blocks (1-2 months) on the ward, antenatal clinic, theatre (elective caesars), birth suite, special care nursery and home visiting as opposed to a day in birth suite, next day on the ward like the other midwives.

    Quote Originally Posted by spice View Post
    Just to put in my 2c regarding doing RN then postgrad mid versus a BMid degree. Keep in mind there is a culture shift occurring. Come 5-10 years time RM's without RN qualifications will be the norm. There are reasons why the uni's are phasing in BMid degrees and phasing out post grad mid diplomas etc. There is a bit of a stigma about " how could a bmid midwife possibly be as competant as a post grad midwife but the BMid courses are very comprehensive and I can only speak for my uni (GU) but we learn things like canulation, venepuncture and perineal suturing as a standard part of our degree and there are many existing midwives who have dual RN/RM qualifications who have never learnt canulation or suturing. Just something to think about
    We did this in our course as well, but unfortunately did all the workshops in our final semester and the hospital I was doing prac at you needed to have completed their official workshop packages to cannulate/venepuncture and the rmo's or registrars (if it was a nasty tear) did perineal suturing so I never got to practice any of those skills. Which was fine by me because I was too busy trying to figure out to manage my time effectively and finehone my "basic" skills. I will be doing my hospitals learning packages/workshops before I'll be putting needles or sutures into anyone Personally I think being able to manage a patient load on the ward effectively and being able to safely manage a labour and birth is more important than being able to take bloods etc as a newly-graduated midwife.
    Last edited by wannawannabe; 30-12-2012 at 23:18.

  8. #477
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    Default 2012 Nursing and Midwifery students chat

    I fully agree that we should have comprehensive knowelege about meds. It is covered in our degree to a point but I intend to do the nursing medications subject as an elective for that reason

    Also at GU we do canulation, venepuncture and suturing in the second year. We have to compete 6 of each supervised but unassisted in order to be marked off. I don't think any additional training is required after that.

    And oh, the woman with the cough post cs. I had that issue after my second CS and had lots of gunk I needed to dislodge with coughing. A mw gave me a rolled up towell that she'd stuck together with masking tape and told me to hold it against my incision when I coughed. It still hurt a bit but was more bearable. That and staying on top of pain relief helped I think.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spice View Post

    And oh, the woman with the cough post cs. I had that issue after my second CS and had lots of gunk I needed to dislodge with coughing. A mw gave me a rolled up towell that she'd stuck together with masking tape and told me to hold it against my incision when I coughed. It still hurt a bit but was more bearable. That and staying on top of pain relief helped I think.
    yeah unfortunately we've worked out this poor lady has pneumonia and my point was if she wasn't a post cs she would be on a medical ward, hence why it's important if doing the bmid to make sure common medical conditions are covered so you can manage pregnant/post partum ladies safely who present with these.

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    Default 2012 Nursing and Midwifery students chat

    Yes absolutely we're always going to be dealing with women who have complex needs or other medical conditions. Time and experience on the job will increase your competence and confidence in these situations. You're doing great . I was just offering a practical tip for when you're caring for a post cs woman with a cough

  11. #480
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    Quote Originally Posted by spice View Post
    Yes absolutely we're always going to be dealing with women who have complex needs or other medical conditions. Time and experience on the job will increase your competence and confidence in these situations. You're doing great . I was just offering a practical tip for when you're caring for a post cs woman with a cough
    Yeah that definitely does help


 

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