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  1. #361
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    Quote Originally Posted by Parksider View Post
    Thank you for the clarification on the suturing/cannulation issue. My info was from the two courses I am looking at (one a BMid, the other a dual) - I had just assumed that all BMids were "created equal", and that the skills gained at the end would be the same regardless of which program you went with. Very interesting!

    So, new question for all the student nurses and midwives:

    What is something that you wished you could have known before starting your course? This could be anything to do with the course itself, lifestyle changes etc etc. Any input much appreciated!
    • Some lecturers give a damn, but many don't seem to. If you put in the work and get along well with your lecturers they are more likely to assist you in your learning when you have Qns than if you never turn up to lectures etc.
    • Split the work load with friends- we split learning objectives up between a group of us, each taking a week and covering the learning objectives. Makes it SO much easier as you don't spend forever looking for answers, which is what takes the most time. Find a group of people who work similarly to you and have a similar work ethic and you can save yourselves hours of time. Great for studying for exams.
    • Rosters are what they are. There is very little flexibility in public hospitals due to the number of students etc. You just have to make it work. If you can't, then realistically the job isn't for you as that is pretty much what it will be when you graduate.
    • End note is your best friend, as is Booko (for buying text books)
    • don't go out and buy things till you really know you need them. I have lots of text books I have basically never used!
    Quote Originally Posted by Brunfelsia Dreaming View Post
    Anyone have any interview tips to share? Haven't had one yet but am feeling very nervous about it all. Writing a cover letter is also like doing an assignment! any tips welcomed
    Interviews- Just relax. All mine were really friendly. They were fantastic and helped talk you through things. If you don't understand a question ask for clarification. Take a drink of water, or have a drink if they provide one. Gives you something to focus on if you need a second to think, and prevents dry slaggy mouth- never a good look when nervous. All mine had qns on obstetric emergency management so know those main ones well ( as you would by now anyway).

    Cover letter- I think it is important to include something interesting about yourself from your prac/coc's. I included that I was interested in working with women who have had adverse outcomes after working with a coc through 2 pregnancies who had a still birth with the first one. I got an interview at all 4 places I applied for. They weren't interviewing everyone so I am certain that helped me to get interviews. It is something I am very passionate about now, and the interviewers asked me about it in all of my interviews.

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    JJJCB  (28-10-2012),Parksider  (18-09-2012)

  3. #362
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    Can understand interviewing people who have done placement there, thats fair enough. But not the proximity to the hospital thing. They don't know that I'm quite willing to drive the 2 hours for an interview! That bit annoys me.
    One Griffith student did 2 years of prac at GC before changing to another hospital & she didn't get an interview either!


    RHJ - Thank you for those tips. Will get back onto finishing my cover letter (got sidetracked with never ending assessments).

    Just wondering what prac the 3rd years are doing this semester? We only had 80 hours in the SCN but have heard UQ are doing 4 days a weeks & have no assessments to worry about (which would be fantastic)...

  4. #363
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brunfelsia Dreaming View Post
    One Griffith student did 2 years of prac at GC before changing to another hospital & she didn't get an interview either!RHJ - Thank you for those tips. Will get back onto finishing my cover letter (got sidetracked with never ending assessments).Just wondering what prac the 3rd years are doing this semester? We only had 80 hours in the SCN but have heard UQ are doing 4 days a weeks & have no assessments to worry about (which would be fantastic)...
    My third year at UQ (finished this year) was spent doing 32 hours of prac a week in the hospital (usually ended up being more because I'd stay back for births etc), which was a mixture of all shifts across all days. We also had to complete our portfolio which was 14 elements from the ANMC Competency Standards for the Midwife which basically involved research involved about why the standard existed and then how we demonstrated it in practice. For eg. Promotes breastfeeding would require adequate research/information discussing why breastfeeding is promoted, the benefits etc and then adequately proving how we demonstrate that in our everyday practice and then signed off by our preceptor. The portfolio also needed 5 skills (same as the elements but for stuff like inspection of the placenta, management of third stage, normal vaginal birth, vaginal examinations etc), cultural safety module and child safety module. We had to complete the 5 skills and 14 elements each semester for the final two semesters, and I aways wrote at least a 1000 words for each element. They were all due at the same time, but it worked out that you need to be doing at least 2 a week to stay on top of it all. The lecturers would then mark it either say 'yes competent' or 'no add more information regarding this etc' so you'd have extra work. It was a massive undertaking especially when trying to do 4 shifts a week (somehow always ended up on nights) and work part-time. Year 3 was horrible .
    Last edited by wannawannabe; 18-09-2012 at 21:39.

  5. #364
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    Thanks ladies for your tips. They were pretty much along the lines of what I thought you'd say, so that is both comforting and not...

    Follow throughs are one of my biggest worries, as it just makes things so much more unpredictable. I've done a BEd before, so can deal with uni/uni politics/stupid lecturers/prac/assignments falling due during prac etc etc (although all this was before kids, so who knows how I'd really do now kids are on the scene). I like being able to plan, schedule time etc, so the follow through stuff does worry me a bit, but I have come to the conclusion that all I can do is just give it a go and see how it all shakes out. The ladies here who have done a BMid with young families are an inspiration!

    And thanks also RHJ for the reminder that if the roster-bound lifestyle of a nursing degree doesn't suit during the degree, then it probably won't work for you as a lifestyle once it's your job. All great stuff to take on board.

    Good luck with all of those cover letters and interviews everyone!

  6. #365
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    Quote Originally Posted by Parksider View Post
    Follow throughs are one of my biggest worries, as it just makes things so much more unpredictable.
    Follow throughs were the biggest cause of stress and anxiety for me. I used to freak myself out so much that I would miss a birth or not make enough appointments etc.

    This is what worked for me.....
    1) I was really lucky in that my hospital ran certain clinics on certain days. So Obstetrics clinic was Wednesday mornings, Group practice was Thursday mornings and midwives clinics were every weeknight, but you went the same day each time and saw the same midwife. I picked a weeknight that I knew wouldn't clash with part-time work and tried to only pick up follow throughs who would be attending clinic that evening. That way I knew to just keep Tuesday evenings from 5-9pm free as I would be at the antenatal clinic each week with a different follow through. That worked for 6 of them. 3 of them went to the group practice clinic on a thursday morning which was easy as I was usually already at the hospital for prac then and would just duck over to antenatal clinic for their appointment. And my last one went to obstetric clinic which worked out the same as I was usually at the hospital anyway.

    Having appointments on the same night each week for 6 follow throughs made it really easy

    2) Learn to read a calendar. Just because they're due 2 weeks before your first exam does not mean that they won't go ridiculously over and you end up pulling all nighter at the hospital when they get induced 2 days before your exam. That sucks. Wouldn't advise it. Prioritise yourself first....

    which brings me to my next point....

    3) This one was the hardest one for me to accept but...... they will still have the baby regardless of whether or not you make it to the birth. Try to make it, it is important and you'll both be really happy for it, but that baby will still come out even if your not there. And hopefully you've empowered her enough that her/her partner can advocate for her wishes without you. (And if you make half an hour late/had to leave early before she gave birth, you can always be sneaky and still write it up as if you were there..... Unless you actually need a midwife to sign something. Then that plan will fall apart.). But moral of the story don't beat yourself up if for whatever reason you miss. Women can and do have precipitous labours, premature labours, forget to call you etc.

    4) Make sure they call you. If that means you have to write your name, phone number all over her pregnancy health record so that at least the midwife can call you, then do it.

    5) Spread them out!!! You do not want 4 due within 3 weeks. It sucks. Comes back to reading a calendar. I picked mine online dating style by reading charts for that nights clinic and going 'yes she's due at an appropriate time, she sounds normal etc'.

    6) When she calls you say she's in labour and on the way to hospital.....don't kill yourself trying to get there quickly. The amount of times I bounced of bed, skipped breakfast and didn't pack a lunch, made it to the hospital 20 minutes before she did and didn't get a baby until 10 hours later was ridiculous. Unless she's about to give birth in the car, take the time to get yourself their safely.

    7) Figure out when you want to go in. I have no kids or responsibilities apart from my part time job (which conveniently had a few pregnant employees that I borrowed...) so I could head up to the hospital as soon as she did when she felt that first twinge and stay there for 12 hours (or bounce back and forwards between my house and birth suite for the day....). It's going to be individual for each labour obviously, but try and get an idea of what stage of labour she's at etc so you can work out when will be ideal to go in. But don't just show up for the birth. Midwives will hate you for that.

    7) Do yourself a favour and find a woman who's having an elective caesarean. Whether its twins, breech, placenta previa, repeat elective, a) you get to pencil a time and date into your diary for her birth (its okay to feel okay about that as a student hehe), b) whatever she needs the c/s for could be cool and different to write up about and c) you get to practice all your awesome how to make a caesarean section empowering and how to breastfeed in recovery skills. Plus approx 33% of births are caesareans now, electives are good low-stress way to see what goes down in theatre, before you get thrown an emergency one in the middle of the night in your third year.

    Anyone else have some follow through tips - what worked and didn't work for them?

  7. #366
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    Thanks wannawannabe - not so cushy 3rd year after all - although we only needed 80 SCN hours we are still NEVER ending when it comes to assessment!

    You also did a great job of telling it like it is when it comes to the follow through experiences. I cannot think of anything to add atm.

    I do hope you (we) get a job; all our hard work definitely deserves a job!

  8. #367
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    I'd be interested to know, from those in the course, how often do you do night shifts? I just want to know what I'm in for, as I'm single and although I'm moving in with my dad and his partner soon, I want to know if it's going to be a huge problem having to work nights. I have no issues with the roster style of work, as I have a good support network with regards to the kids, but I have no idea how many hours work you do during uni.

  9. #368
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood View Post
    I'd be interested to know, from those in the course, how often do you do night shifts? I just want to know what I'm in for, as I'm single and although I'm moving in with my dad and his partner soon, I want to know if it's going to be a huge problem having to work nights. I have no issues with the roster style of work, as I have a good support network with regards to the kids, but I have no idea how many hours work you do during uni.
    My uni (UQ) we only did night shifts in our 3rd final year, when we were on full-time placement and matched to a preceptor midwife so we just worked her roster. First and second year was only morning/day and afternoon/evening shifts (finished at 1030/11) and we did get rostered on for weekends as the hospital cracked it and further limited the number of students on at one time so we had to do weekend shifts to fit it in.

    My friend at QUT (nursing) is about to graduate in November and has never worked a night shift before. And won't.

    If you're doing mid (can't remember what your doing sorry Hollywood), just remember that even if you don't get a rostered night shifts, your follow throughs could go into labour/birth overnight and you'll need a plan for when you get a phone call at midnight to come in....

    Edit: Got grad job 2.0!!! Fingers crossed it actually happens
    Last edited by wannawannabe; 21-09-2012 at 14:56.

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  11. #369
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood View Post
    I'd be interested to know, from those in the course, how often do you do night shifts? I just want to know what I'm in for, as I'm single and although I'm moving in with my dad and his partner soon, I want to know if it's going to be a huge problem having to work nights. I have no issues with the roster style of work, as I have a good support network with regards to the kids, but I have no idea how many hours work you do during uni.
    For us- @ monash Uni- it depended on the hospital you are placed at. Some haven't done nights at all while studying. I have only done 4 night shifts when I was in 2nd year. The hospital I am at now doesn't ask us to do any night shifts, but I have a friend who has done heaps- her whole SCN placement was night shifts. I am going to offer to come in for some once I finish my consolidation block just to get my births- they will put me on call for births.

  12. #370
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    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post

    Edit: Got grad job 2.0!!! Fingers crossed it actually happens
    congratulations!

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