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  1. #341
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    Default 2012 Nursing and Midwifery students chat

    Thanks Danann11, it does help. I hope I can (assuming I get accepted!) be on campus the minimum time as I have 2 little ones and I just hope I have enough time to sort out daycare when I get the timetable. I have never done this before so am a bit clueless!!

    Can any full time students share their workload?? You don't necessarily have to attend ACU, I'm just after an idea as to how many days you attend campus for BMid.

  2. #342
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    Congrats Glover!

    Also whats major differences between working in private hospital as opposed to a public hospital as a midwife? I know that all the decisions are made by the woman's OB but is there a different 'type' of midwife that chooses to work in private, the work culture and most importantly do you ever get to catch the baby or is that always the OB?
    I know this bit of the convo went to a PM, but I was just wondering whether anybody with some experience in a private setting could answer this question at all? From my own experience as a patient in several private settings, I think I can guess the answers, but I'd like to hear informed opinions too...

  3. #343
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    Quote Originally Posted by Parksider View Post
    Congrats Glover!



    I know this bit of the convo went to a PM, but I was just wondering whether anybody with some experience in a private setting could answer this question at all? From my own experience as a patient in several private settings, I think I can guess the answers, but I'd like to hear informed opinions too...
    Big thanks to RHJ for her experience (I'll let her spill if she wants to) but would also love to hear other peoples experiences.

    I got a few shock looks of horror when I told a couple of my preceptors (public hosp) that I was interviewing with private, to which my response was 'well would like to offer me a job instead then'......So feel like I'm getting myself into something I don't want to be in.....

  4. #344
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    I am still a student, so have not worked in private yet other than that obviously. Let me begin by saying, if you were to look back over these threads to when I was first placed at private I was incredibly anti it all and worried. But, now having worked there I love it. Yes, public is awesome as I would have been able to practice to my full scope. If things were different in regard to grad years, I probably would have tried to go public for that but I have really enjoyed private, and it does have some lovely benefits also.

    So "whats major differences between working in private hospital as opposed to a public hospital as a midwife? I know that all the decisions are made by the woman's OB but is there a different 'type' of midwife that chooses to work in private, the work culture and most importantly do you ever get to catch the baby or is that always the OB?"

    The scope of practice is certainly less in private. We don't do antenatal, but I know next year I can go and do some with the midwife who works with one of the OB's if I want to- but it has to fit in around how busy our ward is. We still run the parenting classes though. You do have to sometimes work harder to advocate for what you feel is best for the woman you are caring for. It can be harder to do with some OB's than others, but you build a relationship with them and you can start to really positively effect the care. People seem to think that just because a woman has chosen private care that they don't need midwives to advocate for them. It is really no different to caring for a high risk woman in labour who has an OB as their lead carer. They still need our assistance, care and support.

    Post natal care in private is lovely. It can be really really busy, but I have found as a student I have so much more time to really help women with breastfeeding and baby care, debriefing births, and just supporting them in their journey as you have longer with them. So many more of our women leave looking (and I hope feeling) in better control of things as they have had the support 24/7 for a bit longer.

    There is no midwife "type" that is more suited to private. Everyone has a place. Women still want excellent care. They want our knowledge of labour, birth and breastfeeding and baby care. I have seen some very pro- natural midwives and some who are go with the flow. Some who are all for the interventions. Ultimately I believe it comes back to the fact that women in ALL midwifery settings need awesome midwives to care for them and help them get the best birth for them!

    ATM I get to catch the baby aI have to get the numbers for registration, but as a grad/experienced midwife, there are certainly times that you can catch the baby, if the OB doesn't make it in time, is in theatre etc.

    I have really loved being a student in a private hospital. The staff are SO much friendlier than the hospital I was at, more willing to help each other when they see that someone needs help etc. I am really excited to be there again next year as a grad. I know I will be well supported.
    Last edited by RHJ; 07-09-2012 at 16:43.

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to RHJ For This Useful Post:

    Danann11  (08-09-2012),JJJCB  (28-10-2012),Parksider  (13-09-2012)

  6. #345
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glover View Post
    Thanks guys, going to specialise next year and do my Grad dip, and hopefully clinical nurse specialist in 2 years.
    So not Midwifery? What are you specialising in? (Apologies if you've mentioned it earlier).

  7. #346
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    Gah, forum ate my post! Short version:

    Thank you RHJ, for your insights! It sounds like you are at a great private setting. I totally agree that women in private care still need (and often especially need) a midwife to advocate for them.

    You confirmed many of my suspicions (full disclaimer: could not use our public birth centre, so all of my kids were delivered in private hospitals - those experiences, plus lots of reading around and talking with people is where I form my opinions).

    A few q's if it's ok:

    a) Doing your BMid in a private setting, are you tied to an OB/group of OBs? And are they generally happy about you doing the catching to get your numbers?
    b) Relatedly, as the patient is technically the OBs, who supervises your practice? The OB or your midwife preceptor? Who would provide guidance if you needed it as you were delivering a woman?
    c) Obviously perineal repair/suturing is part of the course - are the OBs at your setting happy to step back and let you do that too?

    Thanks for sharing your experiences here

  8. #347
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    RHJ, thanks for the reminder that things can and do change so much over the course of a couple of years. Who knows, the situation could be completely different in a few years time. I am reminding myself of this as I take the plunge with starting the degree, even though all signs at the moment would suggest it is a pretty silly thing to do.
    Last edited by Parksider; 15-09-2012 at 12:49.

  9. #348
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    Quote Originally Posted by Parksider View Post
    Gah, forum ate my post! Short version:
    A few q's if it's ok:

    a) Doing your BMid in a private setting, are you tied to an OB/group of OBs? And are they generally happy about you doing the catching to get your numbers?
    b) Relatedly, as the patient is technically the OBs, who supervises your practice? The OB or your midwife preceptor? Who would provide guidance if you needed it as you were delivering a woman?
    c) Obviously perineal repair/suturing is part of the course - are the OBs at your setting happy to step back and let you do that too?

    Thanks for sharing your experiences here
    Gah, Forum just ate my post too! LOL. Often do that when I have hit quick reply. Here we go again...

    a) I work with all the OB's that are tied to the hospital. The hospital tells them they are are a teaching hospital and it is expected that the students are allowed to catch the babies, under the OB's guidance. They would take over though for obstetric emergencies like shoulder dystocia though. Most are very supportive of us. They generally double scrub with you the first time or so till they are confident in your skills. Then they let you go for it. I had one even fix up my birth trolley the way I liked my clamps and scissors as he realised someone else had set up the trolley (I had only just come on shift and hadn't looked at it yet) so he turned them around for me. Most of them seem to quite enjoy teaching. The women don't seem to mind either.

    b) It really is no different from the public system. I work with the midwife appointed to look after that woman on that shift. During the actual birth the OB will often guide you if they have any comments ( I started there in 3nd year so was already doing births so knew what I was doing).The midwives then tell you if midwifery practice differs from what the OB tells you a bit later once you are out of the room and away from the OB and woman- just so you learn more common midwifery practice rather than obstetricians preferences for doing things. Often you see OB's (and some midwives) with their fingers in trying to stretch the peri and "make room", which isn't needed, so the midwife will usually point that out etc. For antenatal appointments I will be working with the midwife who works for the OB, and then the initial appointment competency I will do with one of the OBs. One of them seems to really enjoy the teaching side and has already agreed to do this one with me.

    c) suturing is not part of the course, it is an optional extra done at a later date, like cannulation etc..

  10. #349
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    RHJ Great to hear how it works in a private setting

    I just wanted to share that at Griffith uni, we do learn suturing, venepuncture and cannulation. We have to do them as part of our practical requirements & the skills fall in with the continuity of care philosophy.

  11. #350
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brunfelsia Dreaming View Post
    RHJ Great to hear how it works in a private setting

    I just wanted to share that at Griffith uni, we do learn suturing, venepuncture and cannulation. We have to do them as part of our practical requirements & the skills fall in with the continuity of care philosophy.
    We also had this as part of our course but only learnt in the final semester and the hospital that I did prac at required to have completed their competency module signed off before you could practice anyway. I'm way too scared to go near anyones perineum with a suturing kit and will quite happily leave that one to the doctors for the next few years at least. I always did the perineal inspection though, and got the doctors to explain what they were doing when they were suturing.


 

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