+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 46
  1. #21
    headoverfeet's Avatar
    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    18,954
    Thanks
    3,142
    Thanked
    4,892
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    I don't get it, we only use 3-4 disposable nappies a day, use cloth wipes, only use 350-400g of meat a meal (free range chicken), I only use eucalyptus oil and detergent for cleaning, I buy laundry liquid in bulk, we only use basic toiletries (I don't wear makeup)...

    I can do $200 most weeks but those weeks we need toilet paper or other bulk items throws us off.


    Sent from my iPad using Bub Hub app

  2. #22
    headoverfeet's Avatar
    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    18,954
    Thanks
    3,142
    Thanked
    4,892
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by MothersInstinct View Post
    Yes, Aussie farmers direct - I feel your pain they didn't deliever to my last address and the amount our grocery bill went up was ridiculous - We also eat atleast 2 serves fruit and 5serves veg a day and their fruit and veg boxes are great value and the produce is great. A2 milk would be a killer almost $5 for a 2litre bottle, we also get our milk delievered by AFD Meat is sometimes delievered by AFD but we usually get it straight from the abbattoir. I hope they deliever to your area soon, they really are great Have you tried the freshfarmers markets for fresh produce?
    Yeah I actually scored the milk going out this week so grabbed it for 62% off and put it in the deep freezer. There is a market on Saturdays but it's not any cheaper than Coles and sometimes more expensive.


    Sent from my iPad using Bub Hub app

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    321
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked
    51
    Reviews
    0
    my DH and I have been bad because when we are hungry we will just drive to shops and get something... somtimes we are at the shops everyday coz we feel like dessert or crave a particular food. I know a lot will change once baby comes and our feeding habbits be one of them !

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    321
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked
    51
    Reviews
    0
    where we live farmers market is all gourmet luxury stuff that is just as if not more $$$ then coles... But i hate coles and woolies fruit and vege, are are always dead looking and going off.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to babybloom For This Useful Post:

    AvasMumma  (31-12-2011)

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Launceston
    Posts
    13,466
    Thanks
    732
    Thanked
    2,355
    Reviews
    35
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    We spend $200 MAX a fortnight!!! So yes very doable!

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    569
    Thanks
    63
    Thanked
    112
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    You will see a lot of variation with grocery prices here, some people will shake their heads in disbelief at the thought of families being able to eat healthily on $200 (or less) per week, other will be aghast that some families spend more than $200 per week and will assume that must include a lot of luxury items. Grocery prices (and hence grocery budets) are not homogenous across Australia and there can be large variations in the cost of groceries - especially basics. People in large cities can usually get away with spending less and still getting all the necessities and enough treats to be healthy and satisfied. Rural dwellers often find it hard to even afford to most necessary of basics on that amount.

    I live in a capital city, my grocery bill is around $250 per week for a family of 7 - including 2 in nappies full-time and 2 in dri nights. My youngest (12 months) is still breastfed and doesn't eat a lot of solid foods (she was born extremely prem and she controls how much solids she eats). We also eat a very good diet with the right amounts of protein, fruits and vegies and wholegrain sources of carbohydrates. I don't bulk out meals with cheap pasta or white rice and we have cut our bread consumption way back. Some people tell me that it's impossible to feed my family this way on $250 a week, to me it's unfathomable to spend more than this on a smaller family without there being astronomical levels of wastage....neither of us is "right" - it's just different perceptions based on where we live and what we have personally available. My biggest tip is meal planning and carefully measuring portions so that there is no wastage....nothing gets thrown out around here. If I open a jar of cranberry jelly I freeze whatever I don't use and then when I make meatballs or something I will defrost it and use it. We are a family of grazers, so it can seem like all we do is eat all day but I never make big meals. All of our meals will fit onto a bread plate, but we will eat 6 times a day and overall we probably eat less than if we were to have 3 large meals every day. None of us are overweight (although I am borderline atm - but losing).

    I don't go to the produce markets that often as the cheap ones are in the CBD and I usually can't be bothered making the trip. I do shop a lot in ethnic stores as they have really cheap prices for a lot of things that are so much cheaper than in the big stores (rice, spices, spring onions, some cheeses, lentils, grains, dried fruit and vegetables - eg mushrooms, onions). We don't have an aldi here, but woolworths and coles are both in the same centre that I frequent so I will go to both and buy the specials in both. I also go very early in the morning (8am) or later at night (6pm) and grab a lot of markdown meats and breads to freeze (on a good day I can grab lots of yoghurt too). I have a very good awareness of what things cost so I know what is a good price to buy an item at and will get it if it's a good price, most of the time I know if I can get it cheaper elsewhere. I buy fruit and vegies in season and will buy organic for the "Dirty Dozen" - everything else is non-organic (unless the organic is on special and cheaper). Most of the vegies and fruit found in the ethnic stores (asian grocers and the like) are usually organic anyway (although not certified). I also get a lot of produce from my parents who have a very large vegie garden. Eggs are always brought free-range but from a little grocer for $3 a dozen.

    Basically, it pays to meal plan and to really educate yourself on what things around you cost, also to branch out a explore different options available to you. Sometimes we can find good deals and prices in the places we don't expect. Little chinese bakeries are good for bread - my local has 75c loaves (everyday price, not marked down) and for another $3 you can get 6 round rolls and 6 hot dog rolls (bagged together). It's beautiful bread and baked that day and you are supporting a family business. All of my ethnic places I go to look like little holes in the wall, they are dark and dreary and don't really look that appealing (not bright and colourful like supermarkets) but the prices are really amazing and the people working there are usually friendly and you learn a bit about their culture as well. Roadside stalls are good places for produce too. I actually made a friend at one and now I get extra mangos whenever I buy a box :-) I got cherries at one recently and I could barely carry the bag there was so many!!! I gave about a kg to the lady a few doors down and she returned my dish back filled with sliced honeydew melon and watermelon!!! Communities can be such a wonderful, untapped resource. It's also fun to check out new places and deviate from the norm.

    The purpose of my wall-o-text was to say that yes, unless you live in a very high cost of living area then it is most definitely possible to feed a family of 3 on $200 per week.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to ConfettiGirl For This Useful Post:

    nelle7250  (26-12-2011)

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Perth WA
    Posts
    4,038
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked
    180
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    I don't get it, we only use 3-4 disposable nappies a day, use cloth wipes, only use 350-400g of meat a meal (free range chicken), I only use eucalyptus oil and detergent for cleaning, I buy laundry liquid in bulk, we only use basic toiletries (I don't wear makeup)...

    I can do $200 most weeks but those weeks we need toilet paper or other bulk items throws us off.


    Sent from my iPad using Bub Hub app
    Same here. I do everything right and still struggle to stay under that $200/week mark.

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    5,530
    Thanks
    377
    Thanked
    1,526
    Reviews
    7
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by waterlily View Post
    We spend $200 MAX a fortnight!!! So yes very doable!
    How? It's not possible in Tassie surely? Where do you shop?

  11. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked
    6
    Reviews
    0
    Depends what you eat. We eat most things that we want (oysters and crayfish very rarely unfortunately) for about $200 a month.

  12. #30
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,786
    Thanks
    1,021
    Thanked
    2,246
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I have no idea how people live on 100 a week.
    200 is ok.
    I meal plan everything! I go to a cheap fruit and veg shop. I go to a butcher and aldi plus top up at woollies. My fruit and veg costs about $80 a week and we eat heaps of fruit and veg. Meat is a about 40.
    Then aldi and wollies. I don't even buy much junk food.
    I buy washing powder in bulk, toilet paper from aldi which ends up a out 30 cents a roll etc.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Groceries
    By OurLittleBlessing in forum Family Finances
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 12-12-2012, 13:25
  2. How much do you spend on groceries?
    By SpicyTurtle in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 159
    Last Post: 14-11-2012, 10:48
  3. Why are groceries so expensive!!??
    By OS&N in forum General Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-03-2012, 11:22

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Babybee Prams
Save $50 in our pre-Christmas sale! All Comet's now only $500. Our bassinet & stroller set includes free shipping AUS wide, $75 free accessories, 18-months warranty & a 9 month free return policy. Check out our new designer range today!
sales & new stuffsee all
Wendys Music School Melbourne
Wondering about Music Lessons? FREE 30 minute ASSESSMENT. Find out if your child is ready! Piano from age 3 years & Guitar, Singing, Drums, Violin from age 5. Lessons available for all ages. 35+ years experience. Structured program.
Use referral 'bubhub' when booking
featured supporter
Sudocrem / Infacol
Sudocrem® Healing Cream is a soothing emollient cream which aids and assists in the management of nappy rash, eczema, abrasions, wounds and minor skin irritations. Infacol Wind Drops are an effective method of treating wind in infants.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!