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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles10 View Post
    With a natural labour, there is interaction between baby & mum. Mum contracts and receives feedback about how baby is doing. The oxytocin that is released naturally is influenced by baby- baby's position, reaction to contractions etc.

    When syntocin is given from outside Mum's baby, the rate is determined by how the machine is programmed- it doesn't react to how baby is doing, and when baby needs a break.

    The syntocin can be pushing bub down before they have a chance to get in optimal position for birthing, making birthing more difficult for baby and Mum.

    This can cause baby to 'be in distress', mum to find it hard to manage the pain and increase the chances of further intervention.
    That is what I am afraid off and want to avoid.

  2. #22
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    I've had 2 babies and been induced both times. Hoping to avoid it this time, but that all depends on circumstances.

    With the first one I was in my early 20's and didn't really have a clue about anything. My doctor induced me, and to be honest I couldn't give you a reason why. I was just told "it was best", it was right on my due date. It was very intense and I did get an epidural, no other intervention was required though, and baby was born healthy and we bonded right away.

    Second time (different doctor and hospital) I was determined not to be induced, but then I developed pre-eclampsia and started to show signs of HELLP. My OB gave me the option of being induced that day, or having an emergency c-sect the next day, which would be extremely risky as my platelet count had dropped. I chose the induction, I once again had an epidural. Baby and I bonded right away, and even though she was 4 weeks early and a little small, she fed beautifully and we avoided the SCN

    Im keen to experience a naturally starting labour, but it depends entirely on my body. In regards to being overdue, my uncle was born at 44 weeks. The vernix was all gone and his skin had started peeling and was very red. The placenta had started to die already and he was oxygen deprived. He is intellectually disabled and he developmentally is like a seven or eight year old. I realise more monitoring can be done these days to make sure baby is ok, but I'd be very hesitant to go too long.

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    Arusaamatus  (22-12-2011)

  4. #23
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    The mybirth website has a section on induction

  5. #24
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    Hello,

    No experience here as still pregnant with first, and like you, I also want to avoid all unnessary interventions. I have done lots of research on birth options, birth outcomes, and comparing the stats, as well as asking professionals, mums and pregnancy books. I have come to the conclusion that homebirth is the safest and best option for me: and I am much more likely to avoid unnecessary interventions (of course there is a chance I may still end up in a hospital, but in that case any intervention will likely be necessary.)

    If you are in a birthing centre the statistics say you are much more likely to have a natural birth without intervention compared to a public hospital maternity ward, as the "midwifery" view of birth dominates in birthing centres and the "medical" view tends to dominate in hospitals. (And I wouldn't touch a private hospital with a barge poll going from their stats!)...but all hospitals/birth centres have different policies and all staff are a bit different, so really it is a mix of luck and doing your research on that centre/hospital.


    To ensure you get what you want, I'd definitely advise finding an independant midwife who (I've forgotten the correct term) has rights to work in that birth centre/hospital. If not the next best thing is a midwife who doesn't have those rights, or a doula who will stand up for you and your birth plan.

    On the homebirth thing: just something you and your student doctor may not have thought about as an option, is to have a homebirth with both an independant midwife and a GP/ob in attendance. There are still a few doctors around willing to attend homebirths.

    Hope you have a wonderful birth experience!

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Habonia View Post
    Hello,

    No experience here as still pregnant with first, and like you, I also want to avoid all unnessary interventions. I have done lots of research on birth options, birth outcomes, and comparing the stats, as well as asking professionals, mums and pregnancy books. I have come to the conclusion that homebirth is the safest and best option for me: and I am much more likely to avoid unnecessary interventions (of course there is a chance I may still end up in a hospital, but in that case any intervention will likely be necessary.)

    If you are in a birthing centre the statistics say you are much more likely to have a natural birth without intervention compared to a public hospital maternity ward, as the "midwifery" view of birth dominates in birthing centres and the "medical" view tends to dominate in hospitals. (And I wouldn't touch a private hospital with a barge poll going from their stats!)...but all hospitals/birth centres have different policies and all staff are a bit different, so really it is a mix of luck and doing your research on that centre/hospital.


    To ensure you get what you want, I'd definitely advise finding an independant midwife who (I've forgotten the correct term) has rights to work in that birth centre/hospital. If not the next best thing is a midwife who doesn't have those rights, or a doula who will stand up for you and your birth plan.

    On the homebirth thing: just something you and your student doctor may not have thought about as an option, is to have a homebirth with both an independant midwife and a GP/ob in attendance. There are still a few doctors around willing to attend homebirths.

    Hope you have a wonderful birth experience!
    I wish I could have a homebirth, but thats just not possible as we live with the in laws and there is no private space where you can set up a birth pool and stuff. So I am stuck going to a public hospital, because the nearst birth center fills fast, so I will try and get into the birth center, but I am not getting my hopes up. Plus I am trying to find a midwife that can attend my birth at a hospital, but its hard.

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  8. #27
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    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
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    DS was induced and it was a pretty horrible experience. I found the induction to be a very unpleasant and mentally and phyisically painful experience. The pain was so bad I was crying out for an epi within an hour. I was determined not to be induced with DD and didn't. I did a lot of preparation to have a more natural birth and managed the pain so much better (I only had gas at transition.) If you don't want to be induced then practice saying "I am uncomfortable with getting an induction, what are my alternatives".

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  11. #30
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    I was induced at 38weeks with my last two pregnancies due to diabetes and deterioration of the placenta. They were both fantastic experiences and I can't fault them at all.

    I had the tape in over night both times, which dilated me enough for them to break my waters the next day, I had the drip in after they broke my waters, but they allowed me 30mins in the shower to see if things would start on their own, which they did to a small degree, but not quick enough, the drip was started very very low both times, with my first induction, it was kept quite low as things kicked off really well, labour was 3hours and bub never went into distress.

    My last induction, things didn't move at all on the low dose, so they bumped it up, left it for another hour, and then bumped it up again, when it started it hit hard, but I was prepared and was relieved to see things start, bub was born an 1hr15min later, perfectly fine. He had some initial signs of distress because the cord was around his neck and was compressing with the contractions, however I had had multiple scans before hand so we were well aware, and it was only around once which is a lower risk and is quite common anyway.

    I'll need to be induced at 38 weeks again with this one and will no doubt have the drip again. I'm not bothered by that choice I feel like the pain is no different to a normal labour (I've had two before the last two, one of which was a natural start and there is no difference with progression or pain) and I had a much better bonding experience with my babies after birth the last two times as it was all really straightforward and I felt a lot more in control of the situation.

    I have heard a lot of stories from people who have had the drip started at a high level and not moved up or down, which I believe leads to a lot of the high pain levels and distress, my midwives both times were constantly checking the drip and making adjustments up and down, I'd be interested to see how many inductions with the drip were just put on high and left to their own devices.
    Last edited by Mum5; 22-12-2011 at 08:29.

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