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  1. #21
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    I have been through this with my DS! My best advice is just offer whatever you are eating, don't make separate meals. Then you won't be upset if some goes to waste because you haven't gone to any extra effort IYKIM? (as long as your meals you make are generally healthy).
    For snacks - homemade savoury mini muffins are good, you can hide bacon and veg etc in there. Homemade pikelets are good too, you can hide grated apple and berries etc.

    With my DS, he is older now, we can negotiate. He HAS to ty everything on his plate (as least one mouthful) and then after dinner he is allowed a treat (yoghurt or a biscuit or a drink of juice etc). So it does get easier when you can negotiate with them.
    Have you tried baked beans (salt reduced) as a finger food?

    As long as whatever they are eating is healthy, then thats all you can do. Don't offer white bread or white rice/pasta, try to stick with wholemeal and try to offer more natural yoghurts rather than the really sugary kids yoplait-type ones.

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    Guest654  (18-12-2011)

  3. #22
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    Thanks. The problem with offering what we are eating is that she has her dinner at 4.30pm, so we do eat separately at dinner time. Sometimes we'll cook extra (e.g., with spaghetti bolognese), and keep it for her for the next day, but depending on what we have that's not always possible. We eat a lot of very spicy foods that I don't think she would like.

    Mini muffins and pikelets are a good idea. Yes - I think being able to negotiate would be better!

    And I definitely agree. She only has soy-lin bread, wholemeal pasta, and natural yoghurt.

  4. #23
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    My 18 month old is also a fussy eater. She has a few foods she will eat, but the amount she eats is tiny. Breakfast is usally half a piece of toast or a few pieces of dry nutri grain. Lunch is about half a sandwich or 2 chicken nuggets and a small amount of peas and dinner is usually the same. She will eat fruit, so snacks are strawberries, grapes, blueberries, sultanas, baby muesli bars. She won't let me spoon feed her, won't eat off my plate and won't eat anything that feels 'mushy' like bananas or saucy like meatballs. I really wonder how she has so much energy on such little food!

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    Guest654  (18-12-2011)

  6. #24
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    Default Juice, juice, juice!

    Hi,

    Fussy eating is a complete PAIN! I know. A couple of friends of mine with fussy eaters (one was EXTREME - ie would only eat meat and bread, NOTHING ELSE) did juicing to get some nutrients into their kids.

    Get a juicer if you dont have one - second hand will be fine if you cant afford new. Juice veggies, any will do but here are a few suggestions

    -beetroot - the fresh whole beetroot, not tinned!
    -broccoli
    -carrot
    -zucchini
    whatever combination is fine. then sweeten with fruit juice like apple/melon etc. Most kids will drink this, especially if you give it a special name theyll like "buzz lightyer juice" "fairy juice" whatever will entice your kids.

    Might be worth a try.

    Also, have you tried coating veggies in melted cheese or cheese sauce?? This usually works for my son.

    best of luck,

    Kate

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  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by teacherkate View Post
    Hi,

    Fussy eating is a complete PAIN! I know. A couple of friends of mine with fussy eaters (one was EXTREME - ie would only eat meat and bread, NOTHING ELSE) did juicing to get some nutrients into their kids.

    Get a juicer if you dont have one - second hand will be fine if you cant afford new. Juice veggies, any will do but here are a few suggestions

    -beetroot - the fresh whole beetroot, not tinned!
    -broccoli
    -carrot
    -zucchini
    whatever combination is fine. then sweeten with fruit juice like apple/melon etc. Most kids will drink this, especially if you give it a special name theyll like "buzz lightyer juice" "fairy juice" whatever will entice your kids.

    Might be worth a try.

    Also, have you tried coating veggies in melted cheese or cheese sauce?? This usually works for my son.

    best of luck,

    Kate
    Thanks for that.

    We do have a juicer, but I hadn't thought to juice fruit/ veg for her. (One of those appliances that sits in the cupboard...) I've never given her anything to drink other than milk or water, so I'd be slightly concerned that she might develop a taste for juice/ sweet drinks, but definitely one to bear in mind.

    And I have done a tofu and veg stir fry in a cheesy sauce, which she liked. I haven't tried it with veggies straight, so definitely worth a go!

  9. #26
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    [QUOTE=Girl X;6260971]I just don't know how to get her to try new things. She's average weight, so she's not starving, but I worry about her health. I keep reading things about children's food preferences being 'set' in early life, which makes me think I will end up with a child with eating / weight problems or nutritional deficiencies!

    Goodness - relax on the "I'm setting her up for an eating disorder"!

    Just keep offering her healthy foods but don't beat yourself up if she doesn't eat them.

    Stop buying the jars, if they are not in the cupboard she can't point at them, you can show her they're not there anymore and it's just not an option. You wont be able to give in and give her one if she's being demanding about it. If you do need something as a backstop if you don't have time from scratch get some frozen mashed potato and fish fingers or something that can be kept longer term.

    Having fresh healthy options, letting her help with preparation, have plenty of new tastes and also making the old favourites often will set her up for a healthy view on food. Perhaps make a tasting plate of lots of different options and leaving her to it - not making a big deal out of eating everything might just make her have a sneak taste of something while you're not looking? Like blueberries and small things that she can pick up? Put a tiny cup of yoghurt on the same plate and leave her to it.


    Best of luck!

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    Guest654  (18-12-2011)

  11. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hulahoop View Post

    Goodness - relax on the "I'm setting her up for an eating disorder"!

    Just keep offering her healthy foods but don't beat yourself up if she doesn't eat them.

    Stop buying the jars, if they are not in the cupboard she can't point at them, you can show her they're not there anymore and it's just not an option. You wont be able to give in and give her one if she's being demanding about it. If you do need something as a backstop if you don't have time from scratch get some frozen mashed potato and fish fingers or something that can be kept longer term.

    Having fresh healthy options, letting her help with preparation, have plenty of new tastes and also making the old favourites often will set her up for a healthy view on food. Perhaps make a tasting plate of lots of different options and leaving her to it - not making a big deal out of eating everything might just make her have a sneak taste of something while you're not looking? Like blueberries and small things that she can pick up? Put a tiny cup of yoghurt on the same plate and leave her to it.


    Best of luck!
    Haha - thanks. I know - I think the more I read the more I drive myself crazy. All the 'preferences being set very early' articles are scaring me...

    It's the Heinz tins (not jars, but same kind of thing), and she can't see them but I take your point about having them there to fall back on. We've bought them as they're handy to carry if we're out and about, but yes - I think we do need to be better prepared with something 'else' so that they are not an option at all.

    That's a great idea about a tasting plate - will try it - thanks!

  12. #28
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    Subscribing to this, my DS is exactly the same!

  13. #29
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    Subscribing to this one. I have a 23 month old who is exactly the same. Always fighting with her. I will spend hours cooking for her not to touch it. I feel like she is going to turn into one giant cheese stick.

    She has also choked a couple of times so i am extra paranoid about her eating habits.

    Best of Luck!!!

  14. #30
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    Can you mix the baby food with "real food" slowly decreasing the tinned stuff?

    Example the Raffertys Garden pouches as a sauce

    My daughter loves to dip (really strange) foods in tomato sauce & it's a game with daddy to "dip dip"

    Is there an ingredient you can replicate from the baby food Eg cheese

    I used to mix pureed apple with DD food as all the young raffertys contained apple.

    And i've been known to mix parmasen cheese or kraft cheese spread with food


 

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