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  1. #1
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    Default My ob wants me to have a c-section early due to big baby

    Firstly I hope I posted this in the right section. I've been reading this forum for a while now and thought it was time to join with some questions

    At the last check up with my obstetrician I was 28 weeks and had a 35cm fundal height. He told me my baby is "seriously big" and I need to decide on a c-section at 38 or 39 weeks. He also told me the glucose levels on my first test were abnormal so I had to go for the 2 hour glucose test, which has come back all clear. I'm really dreading what he's going to say in my check up this coming Tuesday because he'd basically assumed I had GD and I would be going early for that reason. What can be his reasoning now?

    I've been researching it a bit and read inducing or a c-section early can be equally bad for bubs. I'm 5'3 and the shortest in mine and my husbands family, they all push 6'. Could my baby just be all arms and legs? I had a car accident a few years ago and still suffer back pain so an epidural just terrifies me. Strangely the thought of labour does not, could just be I don't know what I'm in for to

    A bit of background, my first pregnancy was found to have never formed at the 12 week scan and I was over weight before falling pregnant (around a size 16). I'm now 30 weeks and have gained 7kgs.

    I'm sure there are ladies out there that have been there and done this with very similar stories so I'd love to hear how it worked out for you. Any advise is also greatly appreciated. I left in tears after my last visit so I really want to be prepared with all my questions for this coming visit.

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    Can you seek a 2nd opinion?

    A friend of mine was told similar - baby too big etc. csection at 38 weeks that she didn't want (on FB asking & trying every possible natural induction method etc) and I think her baby was under 3.5kgs, which is less than average. So she could have easily gone full term.

    I don't have any personal experience with that though. I've been told my baby girl is a little on the big side (at 21 week ultrasound) but not to be concerned.

    Can they ultrasound/X-ray your baby & pelvis to assess if bubby will fit? I've heard it's unlikely for your body to grow a baby it couldn't birth.

    Though still it does happen.

    Also if you're still unsure you could go full term, go into labour naturally, have a go and change your mind & have a csection. But its not like when baby comes out and it's actually not 'that' big the csection can be undone. Iykwim.

    My SIL just naturally birthed a 4.2kg baby with just a bit of gas for pain relief and recently in Germany there was a 6kg baby delivered naturally. So it's not impossible to birth a larger baby.

    It's totally up to you. Do your own research, if possible get a second medical opinion. I guess the difficult thing can be with an Ob is they are highly trained surgeons, and in some instances don't know how to leave a healthy pregnancy alone because they are trained to deal with the worst case scenarios.

    Best wishes
    Last edited by Boobycino; 02-12-2011 at 13:30.

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    My obstetrician did say I would be having another scan to compare that with the fundal height before 100% deciding. I obviously don't want to do make the wrong choice cause apart from research, it's all so unknown to me. I want to do whatever is best for my baby. I just sometimes wonder if the ob pushes for a c-section so it's nicely during business hours

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    There is no accurate way of saying HOW big your baby is now OR at the time of birth- until it's born. Your OB is grooming you for what appears to be a c/section of convienience- HIS convienience.

    Tell him NO if it's not what you want. If I were you I'd probably find another caregiver but I understand that is a hard issue to tackle so if that's not an option, stand your ground. Read up on your options (you have a choice in everything), arm yourself with knowledge and stay strong in your convictions.
    Good Luck.

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    Hugs.

    Like you I am 5"3, shortest by far on either side. Pre preg I was 52kg. I delivered 9lb8oz ds naturally.

    However unlike you being told youre too big, I was told he was too small and they were freaking out about it!! My friend was pressured into a c-sect as she was told she had gd and a big baby... He was just on 8lb, just lots of fluid.

    I don't have much advice, but just remember it's your birth. You are the one that will remember it forever, once it's over your ob won't think about it again. So stand your ground, as hard as it feels sometimes. Just make sure you do your research (sounds like you are)

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    And fundal height is only a rough guide.

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    Hey there! I would absolutely not take his opinion as gospel, and I would be furious to hear my body being prematurely labelled as defective. It's rare that women actually grow babies too big for them to give birth to, and yet obs continue to tout this as a common occurence. A genuine reason for CPD is ricketts... which I highly doubt you have! And if the GD test has come back negative, there is no other justification for a c-sec, right? he tried to use that as a reason, but now with a negative result, what is his reasoning?

    I know of teeny women who have had very large babies without so much as a graze, and I know of tall, amazonian/curvaceous women who have had very petite babies. You never can tell!

    Ultrasound and palps can be incorrect, and have been, many times, when estimating the size/weight of the baby. I would be incredibly angry that he wants you to consent to major abdominal surgery simply because of a GUESS at the baby's size. I birthed a 10 lb 1 oz baby (4.65 kg) and noone even indicated to me in the slightest I would have a big babe! I always measured average. Again, you never can tell. (The birth was fine by the way, no drugs at all.)

    Sounds like it's worth looking into finding a care provider who actually trusts in your beautiful body to give birth, rather than labelling you and your baby in a negative way. I reckon anyone who has ever been spun the ''big baby'' line MUST read this article by the fantastic midwife, Gloria Lemay: http://midwiferytoday.com/articles/pelvis.asp . As you'll read, pygmy women at an average height of 4'', have average birthweights of 8lbs, and birth them with ease.

    I would be regarding your Ob with high caution. Have you considered a homebirth at all? Many women who encounter these kinds of judgements from obstetricians go on to seek independent midwifery care instead, as they are generally alot more flexible, open and trusting in a woman's body and her innate ability to birth.

    Here are some quotes that ispired me to persue a homebirth, hope they don't offend, but rather offer a new perspective. If you would rather continue with hospital care then I wish you all the best, but I would at the very least be considering a doula for support, and I would be demanding a second opinion. Wishing you loads of luck for your birth!

    "Attending births is like growing roses. You have to marvel at the ones that just open up and bloom at the first kiss of the sun but you wouldn't dream of pulling open the petals of the tightly closed buds and forcing them to blossom to your time line." Gloria Lemay


    "Midwives see birth as a miracle and only mess with it if there's a problem; doctors see birth as a problem and if they don't mess with it, it's a miracle!" Barbara Harper in Gentle Birth Choices

    "Many Western doctors hold the belief that we can improve everything, even natural childbirth in a healthy woman. This philosophy is the philosophy of people who think it deplorable that they were not consulted at the creation of Eve, because they would have done a better job." Kloosterman 1994


    "Treating normal labors as though they were complicated can become a self-fulfilling prophecy." Rooks

    "Unfortunately, the role of obstetrics has never been to help women give birth. There is a big difference between the medical discipline we call "obstetrics' and something completely different, the art of midwifery. If we want to find safe alternatives to obstetrics, we must rediscover midwifery. To rediscover midwifery is the same as giving back childbirth to women. And imagine the future if surgical teams were at the service of the midwives and the women instead of controlling them." Michel Odent, MD


    "The best way to avoid a cesarean is to stay out of the hospital." Brooke Sanders Purves


    "There is no scientific evidence that doing over 10 percent of births with a cesarean improves the outcome for the woman or improves the outcome for the baby." Dr. Marsden Wagner

    "Reluctant doctors like to believe that they haven't much influence over their patients, but that is clearly not the case. Several studies have found that when doctors genuinely encouraged women to have VBACs, most of them did, and when they said nothing or acted neutral, most women didn't. Finally, when obstetricians discouraged VBAC in women who wanted to try it, none of them did." Henci Goer, Thinking Woman's Guide to a Better Birth

    "Having a highly trained obstetrical surgeon attend a normal birth is analogous to having a pediatric surgeon babysit a healthy 2-year-old." M. Wagner

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    Thanks so much for your replies ladies

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    Based on fundal height at 30 weeks I was told that DD would be 5kg. She came out at 2.75kg. It's far too early to make accurate predictions and fundal height is a very rough guide. I'd definitely seek a second opinion and research, research, research. Best of luck getting the birth you want, whatever that may be.
    BTW, my mum is 5'2" and my sister was 11 pounds!

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    Neither fundal height or ultrasounds are EXACT, and I would definitely be seeking a second opinion and doing some hardcore research into the area. My friend was induced because she was apparently carrying a 'big' baby, but he was born under average and actually suffered complications due to his weight.

    I was told DS1 was 6 pound and he was born the next day (spontaneously) at almost 8 pounds.

    It's irrelevant though, nature is amazing - women generally don't grow babies that they can't birth naturally due to size. My teeny tiny friend gave birth naturally to a 10 pounder! It's not uncommon


 

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