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  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merla View Post
    Its hard though, I can see where the landlords are coming from. When you have 10 applications on a house you will naturally choose the lowest risk applicant, and that's often DINK's, 2 working professionals or a couple with good income. What we were told when looking is most landlords consider pets and children to be a risk, and will give properties to a childless petless person over others whenever possible.

    It's not fair, if you can pay the rent then that is what really matters, but at the end of the day renting can be a liability to the owner, especially if they have a loan to service, and they will pick the applicant that appears to be the lowest risk.
    Pets I get. But I'd love to know where the "risk" lies in my 2 foot tall little people They WILL have adult supervision whilst living at the property, believe it or not...

    "Appearance" is the key word. Many single parents (myself included ) make excellent tenants with the very fact that they are on their own with kids the core factor in their excellency. I would NEVER risk my tenancy with my children to consider. My father was the same when we were growing up, and he didn't work for 10 years of private renting. On my own, if I got evicted, meh, I could crash on a mate's couch or stay at a backpackers' or move into a sharehouse. Those options are just not practical when you have a family, and with no-one to fall back on, of course the rent will always be paid...BECAUSE I can't just go and ask my partner to spend his entire paycheck on it this week because I overspent!!!

    My income covers it easily- end of story. I wouldn't have applied for the place otherwise. I should be given as fair consideration as anyone else.

    Unfortunately it appears that a lot of owners and real estate agents are amateurs who seem to think the most effective tenant selection process is look and pick on superficialties. I know my referees haven't been called for the last 6 or so applications I've put in- so I haven't even been given a chance. IF they bothered to do the checks they would find out what "low-risk" I am based on my substantial rental history. Just because someone else works in a certain profession, is partnered or has more disposable income doesn't guarantee they won't present any level of risk...they may have substantial debt...they may have a heavy drug habit...they may get pregnant and become a single mother

    Blah, blah...but when you already are one you're lucky if you even get the chance to prove that you're not any of those things...I wouldn't have truly understood this if I hadn't lived it...it happens...you can be the best tenant in the world but you will probably be overlooked...and as to the landlord, where's the wise business practice in that?

  2. #122
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    I havent read all the replies... But I dont know how things work in other states but here in WA public housing is means tested. If you earn too much You get kicked out. If you suddenly get a job and earn too much you have to move. If you dont tell them what you are earning you get kicked out plus have to pay the money back u should have been paying in rent. If its bad enough you can go to jail.


    So how are all these people who dont deserve to be in these places in them? when they check your tax returns every year.

  3. #123
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    For the same reason that most single mothers are scamming the system and actually rolling in cash- because Today Tonight says so.

    Also wanted to say thanks Delerium for the wonderful compassion you seem capable of showing for people whose experiences lie outside your own- so refreshing to see that now and again

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  5. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lemonhead View Post
    My mum lives in a housing comission house in one of the most sought after, wealthiest parts of Western Australia. Its lovely, she loves it and takes care of it...I don't get how thats being in a "bad cycle"? Its just someone in need using a service that they are entitled to use.

    As for forcing people out into the private rental market well pfft. We rent privately and we pay $360 a week. That is considered cheap and DH is on a very good income and we still notice that come out each week. Its alot of money and for those on the average wage (what is it? $900 a week?) that is a MASSIVE chunk of earnings.
    Housing comission is not nice places all the time. I know of three withing an hour or so of me that are quite horrible, as soon as you find into the street you know it is houso and they are not pretty. The one I know best is called pill hill. I am sure you can guess why.

    I only pay $30 less than you in rent and DF gets less than $550net a week.


    We are eligable for housing. I am going to be looking into community housing and that affordable thing somneone mentioned earlier, for the security. We can afford private, but we had a hell of a time getting this place. I hate to think now that we have an extra child I will not apply for public housing locally though, as it really is disgusting, and I won't live there. I am just hoping that the community housing is nicer. No idea, but I do know the waiting this is about 5 years, even for priority.

  6. #125
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    Hey shockinamillion, just so you know....the housing around here now is owned by the community housing place, not dept of housing. So chances are, if you apply, those kind of areas are where you'd end up. Thats why I refuse to put my name down. I'd rather struggle in private rentals as a single mother than end up raising my child in those scummy areas!

  7. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maybelline View Post
    We own properties ..we have assets ..we have money..I made sure of this before becoming a mum..so if we split..I would still have a place to live and work and be able to provide..

    I don't wish anyone to be a single mum..and can imagine how hard it would be to get a house..
    as i said ...if I was in housing I would be doing everything I could to get out of needing it...

    Also why are people defending/ talking about the look of the housing comm houses? What's that got to do with anything....
    you do realise that is no guarantee that you will have somewhere to live don't you. My friend went from a very comfortable lifestyle to homeless overnight. No job, no access to the kids for quite some time. Almost three years later the property settlement has still not been settled, and is virtually worth nothing because of court costs that have to come out of it because her ex would not agree to anything plus all the debt incurred fighting over the kids. The more assets there are the bigger the fight usually.

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  9. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by mystics View Post
    Pets I get. But I'd love to know where the "risk" lies in my 2 foot tall little people They WILL have adult supervision whilst living at the property, believe it or not...

    "Appearance" is the key word. Many single parents (myself included ) make excellent tenants with the very fact that they are on their own with kids the core factor in their excellency. I would NEVER risk my tenancy with my children to consider. My father was the same when we were growing up, and he didn't work for 10 years of private renting. On my own, if I got evicted, meh, I could crash on a mate's couch or stay at a backpackers' or move into a sharehouse. Those options are just not practical when you have a family, and with no-one to fall back on, of course the rent will always be paid...BECAUSE I can't just go and ask my partner to spend his entire paycheck on it this week because I overspent!!!

    My income covers it easily- end of story. I wouldn't have applied for the place otherwise. I should be given as fair consideration as anyone else.

    Unfortunately it appears that a lot of owners and real estate agents are amateurs who seem to think the most effective tenant selection process is look and pick on superficialties. I know my referees haven't been called for the last 6 or so applications I've put in- so I haven't even been given a chance. IF they bothered to do the checks they would find out what "low-risk" I am based on my substantial rental history. Just because someone else works in a certain profession, is partnered or has more disposable income doesn't guarantee they won't present any level of risk...they may have substantial debt...they may have a heavy drug habit...they may get pregnant and become a single mother

    Blah, blah...but when you already are one you're lucky if you even get the chance to prove that you're not any of those things...I wouldn't have truly understood this if I hadn't lived it...it happens...you can be the best tenant in the world but you will probably be overlooked...and as to the landlord, where's the wise business practice in that?
    Though children in their very nature can be a risk. You may have the most perfect most well behaved toddler in the world but I bet he/she still has accidents when toilet training, spills a drink, throw a toy, decide to "redecorate" the walls, or empty out the bath water all over the floor. If your a landlord with a property with carpets young children are a risk because their unpredictable in their very nature. I understand why people think of young children as a risk, especially as they don't know you or your child.

    Even as a couple we had to apply for 15 properties before we got our current one, for the simple reason that we had a single income and a young child. It's not fair by any means but landlords don't have any insensitive for taking on a larger risk (actual or perceived), so why would they?

    I also know many uni students who have really struggled to find housing for the same reason as there perceived as "high risk" simply by the fact that there all studying and have low incomes.

  10. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merla View Post
    Though children in their very nature can be a risk. You may have the most perfect most well behaved toddler in the world but I bet he/she still has accidents when toilet training, spills a drink, throw a toy, decide to "redecorate" the walls, or empty out the bath water all over the floor. If your a landlord with a property with carpets young children are a risk because their unpredictable in their very nature. I understand why people think of young children as a risk, especially as they don't know you or your child.

    Even as a couple we had to apply for 15 properties before we got our current one, for the simple reason that we had a single income and a young child. It's not fair by any means but landlords don't have any insensitive for taking on a larger risk (actual or perceived), so why would they?

    I also know many uni students who have really struggled to find housing for the same reason as there perceived as "high risk" simply by the fact that there all studying and have low incomes.
    Yep! DS is a pretty well behaved kid. But in his life time- we have had an overflowing bath, paint on the carpet, couldn't possibly count the number of times he's spilled drinks/food on the carpet, balls being thrown inside the house etc etc. Even the most well behaved kids are kids.

    I get where the landlords are coming from. Certainly doesn't make it easy for families to find rentals but such is life- it's whole the world works.

  11. #129
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    I'm not sure about other states but where I live if the family income exceeds 80k/year they are told to leave or buy the house if it's in an area where properties are being sold off. Also I know of many people who have their kids grow up and leave home so they are also told they have 6 months to leave.

    My gripe is with people who do trash the house. They are kicked out but they are often given another house if they have chilren under 16 because they cannot make those children homeless.

    It's a myth (in my state at least) that people can stay indefinitely.

    It's also not only about money. There are soooooooo many other factors that make it impossible for people to rent privately or buy their own home. I've listed them. Others have listed other barriers. I have no doubt in my mind that I ended up a home owner through luck more than anything else even though I'm now a casual worker only.

    I really hope all those people sitting high and mighty don't come crashing down like I know some already have. I'm also glad I never had that attitude and my parents owned their home from a young age and my mother is still that house we grew up in. My father now owns other property across the country too. I'd be ashamed and embarassed if I ever felt that way now or in the past.

  12. #130
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    HAHAHAHAHAHAHA I wish my rent was $60!!! You have no idea. There are a LOT of judgemental people on here!! If you dont know facts, dont judge.


 

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