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    Quote Originally Posted by lambjam View Post
    Erm... the public school you may send your children to is entirely dependent on your catchment area... where you live... real estate.

    I'm talking about the perceived "choices" we have, and saying that if you wish to choose where your children go to school you may do so in one of two ways: 1) Pay for private school or; 2) Pay for real estate in the catchment area of your choice. If you can't afford either of these two options, almost all choice is removed.
    But just because a school is in a "wealthy" area, doesn't mean it's good or better than schools in other areas. This is all perception as well. Berylsmum has said her daughter's public school (on Sydney's North Shore) is a nightmare.

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    lambjam is offline Nitwit! Blubber! Oddment! Tweak!
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    But just because a school is in a "wealthy" area, doesn't mean it's good or better than schools in other areas. This is all perception as well. Berylsmum has said her daughter's public school (on Sydney's North Shore) is a nightmare.
    I'm referring to those areas people specifically move to because they are known to be catchment areas for good schools. Cross the arbitrary border into the catchment area and watch the house prices soar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lambjam View Post
    I'm referring to those areas people specifically move to because they are known to be catchment areas for good schools. Cross the arbitrary border into the catchment area and watch the house prices soar.
    To be honest, I don't think anybody knows how good or bad a school is until you've experienced it.

    The reputation my school has would make your hairs stand on end, but it has changed in the last 7 years, and it is a great school now, but reputations are hard to lose. Unless you go into a school, you don't know. Myschool has not helped at all. Too much focus on one test on one day.

    There's a poster in this thread who once asked me about the school she was in the catchment for. She wanted to send her child out of area because the school had a terrible reputation, I told her not to judge so quickly, and guess what, her catchment school is fantastic. Lucky she didn't just look at myschool and panic or listen to what was being said in the community.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    To be honest, I don't think anybody knows how good or bad a school is until you've experienced it.
    True, and there's no guarantee that what works for another's child will work for mine.

    However schools and teachers need to accept that parents need something to assess them with, and will use the tools that are at their disposal... UAI results, NAPLAN, myschool, reputation, history; none of these alone can tell the full tale but they can contribute to a convincing picture.

    I wouldn't choose a GP, builder or airline with a terrible reputation, and I'll do my best to choose the correct school before my child is sent off to do the guinea pig work for me.

    I'm going well off-track from the OP, so goodbye from me

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    It all depends on someone's experience.

    I've travelled on an airline before that I thought was horrific, yet someone else thought it was the best ever.

    Same can apply for a school.

    Instead of judging a school on reputation and naplan, it would be better to read the school plan, read the annual report, meet the principal, tour the school etc. Don't just judge on a test. University scores? I guess I've not thought that far ahead, worrying about a school's university entrance score, but I don't worry if my children will go to university or not, that's up to them.

    Most private schools have higher university entrance scores, because it is *expected* that their children will go to university, I guess. And study after study have proven that public school students are more successful at university than private school students.

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    We're far from wealthy but I'll respond to the OP anyway. Our kids will go to a public primary school but a private high school. Simply because the public high schools in our area are not as good as a couple of the (many) private high schools. I'm happy with the reputation though of the public primary schools. It'll mean saving our butts off for the next 10 years but so be it.

    I went to a catholic primary and high school but am now agnostic and don't think that type of education is suitable for our kids. DH went to a public primary and high school. Incidentally, his schools were reasonably hard done by in terms of resources etc but he walked out with a scholarship to uni and he and 2 of his school mates are possibly the most intelligent people I know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kristyNluke View Post
    I'm sorry but just because kids go to wealthy schools and are well off they are by far not better behaved, I have heard some horror stories come out of private schools so much so that I would never send my kids to one.
    Totally. I went to a number of expensive private high schools and oh my, the stuff we got up to My DD goes to a school that on paper is low socio-economic area, 30% indigenous pop. Yet bullying is virtually non existant, we have a debate team that got to the state finals last year, and our P&C is extremely active, as is parental involvement.

    I've found it isn't the student make up that is the answer to a good or bad school. It's the staff. My DD has blossomed in this school bc the staff are so dedicated and treat the kids as individuals. ON the flip side I had a few teachers in private that were uninterested, totally uninspiring and one (it ws my year 4 teacher) used to openly mock and bully certain students. Yes a man who went to church every week.

    It's frustrating seeing comments like "i send my child private bc education is a priority to me". So it is to me too, I just don't want the religion and believe it's a misnomer that the best education happens in private.

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    Depends on the actual schools for us. We have avoided the local public schools so much so that our children go to a private school an hour away (we live in the country.) If we lived somewhere with high quality public schools existed we would have no problems sending them there

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    Just to comment on the real estate aspect that was being discussed ( I'm an agent) I could honestly say over half of my buyers who have kids buy in particular areas because of the good reputation of primary public schools

    we have a main road as a cut off from the catchment areas and many buyers won't buy houses on " the other side" as that would mean the kids would have to go to a public primary school with a bad reputation , whereas the one on the other side has a far better one

    it's one of the first things buyers request when looking is if their kids can get into which school, we also have even had people doing 6 months leases in one area so they can get their kids into a certain school , then move back into their homes in another area as once the kids are in school they can move them!

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Most parents think education is a priority. And yes, I do find the attitude that "people will prioritse" a little snobbish, I guess. You said you work in a Christian school, and that your children will go to Christian school. So it is religion that is a priority for you, where for many others, it just isn't. Do you think on 45k you could afford Pymble Ladies' College? I don't think so, so for people whose priority is private education, but not religion, then many private secular schools are out if reach. And that is what is unfair.

    I'm a teacher, I am a firm believer in public education. I will not send my children to private school, even though we could afford it. I think education should be fair for everyone, and it's not. If you think it is fair for everyone, perhaps go and read the Gonski Report.

    I have private health because I have to at my age, not because I want it. I still had my babies in a public hospital. Do you think access to health is equitable as well? If the previous government under Howard didn't strip Medicare to almost nothing, there'd be no need for private health insurance.
    You seem to have a preconceived notion that private = snobbish and elitist, and perhaps that is how I came across in my post, but was not my intention. Like I said - just because private school is a priority for ME and MY FAMILY in OUR SITUATION doesn't mean that I think it should be for everyone, or that others are nit prioritising education as much as me because they use public school. Our local public schools are not high quality, neither is our local private school, IN MY OPINION. I will be sending my child to a private school 20 mins away. The deciding factor isn't that it is a Christian school, it is that I believe it will provide a higher quality education, and that's what's really imprtant to Mr. I appreciate that it is Christian, because I was bullied as a child for being the only 'church girl, goody two shoes' in my class, and I don't want my child to go through the bullying I went through if I can help it.

    I do agree that there are some private schools that are elitist and unattainable. My private school was low fee, $2,000 per year, or $50 per week - a lot less than people would pay for childcare for 5 days. So most people could afford it if they decide that its what they really want, and if we had parents who wanted to enrol their children but struggled financially
    to afford the fees, we would help them out as a school.

    I don't understand your statement that you 'have to have' private health at your age? It is not a legal requirement, you CHOOSE to use private health, just as I choose to use private education. The government funds private health to an extent - do you think that fundi.g should be.taken away and given to public patients instead? How is it fair that you get better health care because you can afford private health and I can't? Can you see that its the same thing?

    I think that we really cannot complain about less funding to private and more to public, when ppublic students already get double what private do. Excludig the mega-rich private schools, you would he suprised to know how much lower-fee private shools really do struggle financially to. I beleive in the importance and value of both public and private education. You seem to be very anti-private, and I think perhaps you have some pre conceived notions about private schools that are incorrect.


 

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