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  1. #1
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    Default Sensory Processing Disorder

    There may already be a thread on this topic but I haven't been onthis site in so long so please forgive me if there already is!


    Just really want to chat to other parents who have achild with SPD.

    thanks

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    Hi there, my (almost) 5 yr old has spd. She is a seeker and struggles most with sensory overload and auditory discrimination.
    We are currently trying sound therapy at home. It has made everything worse, but apparently that means it's working, and hopefully will start to help her soon.
    My biggest concern was starting school as I knew she wouldn't cope and would be treated as a behavior problem. We decided to try a Montessori school instead of main****** and we are hopeful that the Montessori environment will suit her.
    I am south of Wollongong (nsw), where are you? I'd love to hear about your child and your experiences.

  3. #3
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    bgbgbb is offline To think, I was only going to have 1 child!
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    My DD (nearly 7) is also a sensory seeker in the touch & vestibular senses & she has diagnosed auditory processing problems. We only discovered the SPD when she regressed with her toilet training. The paed said that she loves the sensation of wet or soiled pants because it stimulates her touch needs.

    We immediately sought out services that are provided to pre-schoolers and got her free occupational therapy which gave us a good guide on how to harness her SPD. Despite the fact that she's intelligent we held her back from school a year (she was young for her class anyway), which gave her that extra year to mature and learn different coping strategies. But there are times when it's not easy, such as when she forgets to wear underpants, or is smelly when she soils hers or gets all touchy-feely with a child at school who doesn't like being touched.

    Its a disorder that is not seen as a serious disorder and as such gets very little 'airtime' so to speak. I found it was important for me to educate my daughter's teachers so they could understand her better, and so the emphasis was placed on me to learn as much as I cold about it.

    I do recommend activities such as pottery (if they are touch-seeking) & gymnastics (to give their bodies stimulation generally), things that can satisfy their sensory needs but that are not socially unacceptable.

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    Hi

    both my boys have some sensory issues DS1 more so

    DS1 is a mixed bag he is mainly Hyposensitive (Under-Responsive) and is a seeker with Tactile (touch), Gustatory (taste),Olfactory (smell) ,Vestibular and Proprioceptive Senses

    where for Auditory his Hypersensitive(Over-Responsiveness/Defensive)
    His visual senses are slightly effected by this but he is a every visual boy and notices everything around him but it does'nt effect him to much

    he also has Auditory-Language Processing Dysfunction and Social, Emotional, Play, And Self-Regulation Dysfunction

    where DS2 is mostly
    Hypersensitive(Over-Responsiveness/ Defensiveness) with
    Auditory, Tactile (touch), Gustatory (taste), Olfactory (smell),Vestibular and Proprioceptive Senses and is not a seeker

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    wow thanks for this thread, I had to google SPD and I am amazed I have just found another thing my now 21yo son has. After reading the check list he is Hyposensitive in all area's and ticks off nearly all of the other symptoms they mentioned as well (not the hyper ones). What a shame I couldn't get any info about this when he was a child, life, in particular school life would have been so different.

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    We go to a sensory gym

  7. #7
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    Go the seekers! My son too is a seeker. He did have some overactive responses initially but he is definitely more more more nowadays and has been for a while.

    I had never heard of SPD until May this year. All the professionals we had seen were trying to decide if he was autistic we finally got referred off for Occupational Therapy (somehow it took a while for this conclusion to be reached that he would benefit from OT) he had already been in speech therapy for some months.

    Anyway, as soon as we got there the OT handed me information to read on SPD and got to work with my son. That day was the day everything started to make sense. And the response in him was instant- I have fallen in love with the magic of OT. Everything improved, his speech, his attention (could not stay at one task or even stay still for longer than 60 seconds), his roughness (I have worried for the safety of my youngest more than once). Don't get me wrong we still have some complete off the charts crazy days but at least I understand him now and his needs. I just wish the other people in his life would understand.

    We were living in Darwin at the time, and have recently moved to Perth- I was very nervous about what the move would do to him and switching therapists but it has been fairly smooth, he has connected right away with both therapists and his sensory integration therapy is at a practice that's just for kids.

    He is only 3 and a bit so I havent had to worry too much about the school thing yet- but it does concern me and the shoes issue and obviously the attention. The paed says that will be our biggest challenge. He did have a special aide at his childcare in Darwin and that helped him focus a little more.

    I find it disappointing that awareness of SPD is few and far between or is met with skepticism. I especially can not stand when someone tells me I'm wrong and he is just being a "toddler" the results in therapy speak for themselves and the results when he is out of therapy- like right now his therapist is on holidays and we are feeling the effects of that- as in he and I. I understand it is a tricky disorder and not a lot of info is out there, hell I didn't even know of it until earlier this year- but the total lack of wanting to understand or even trying to understand is what grinds my gears.

    He is pretty much affected by all the senses. Some auditory sensitivity, some nights the noise of the shower is too much for him. Vestibular, proprioception and tactile are his main areas but he has issues in all seven.

    Besides OT and his speech, I was considering some music therapy because he really responds to dance and music- has anyone tried this?

    So nice to hear from you all, it's nice to know we're not alone in this! I wonder how many SPD sufferers are never diagnosed or properly diagnosed. I bet there would be a lot.

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    We have tried sound therapy. It made everything worse to start with but apparently this is normal and means the brain is rewiring. Like sounds at her preschool were more intense and she couldn't stand it, but now we are having a break and things are better than ever! I recommend it. DD will be back on the sound therapy in a couple of weeks when she starts an intensive OT program.

    I am a tad skeptical about SPD too. My paed said sensory processing can need help developing, but to be a disorder means no change. I have seen massive improvements in the last 6 months, and im hopeful that my DD will continue to improve. Perhaps it's wishful thinking!

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    PS. Even if a child likes music, it is very hard to listen to. There are songs and sounds that are pierced with different frequencies throughout. My DD hates it and to be honest,I hated it when I tried listened to it. I had to use bribery to get her to sit through it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsc84 View Post
    I find it disappointing that awareness of SPD is few and far between or is met with skepticism. I especially can not stand when someone tells me I'm wrong and he is just being a "toddler" the results in therapy speak for themselves and the results when he is out of therapy- like right now his therapist is on holidays and we are feeling the effects of that- as in he and I. I understand it is a tricky disorder and not a lot of info is out there, hell I didn't even know of it until earlier this year- but the total lack of wanting to understand or even trying to understand is what grinds my gears.
    HERE HERE. I have an over sensitive 9 year old who appears to have been hyperlexic as a toddler. He was starting to read at 2 years old and is a numbers whiz. He can't stand loud noise, screams at the slightest scrape and has terrible nightmares. He's got shocking phobia's which appear to be a combination of hyperlexia and sensory problems. Beautiful child but frustrating all at once because people immediately think I've wrapped him in cotton wool all his life which couldn't be further from the truth.

    On the other end of the scale I have a 4 year old seeker. (Fancy a game of quidditch anyone?) Who also has PDD. Both I hadn't heard of before we started down the long road of 'Diagnosis'.
    People Drive me insane when they glare at me because my child is spinning frantically, standing on his head, climbing on me and stomping his feet in time to his words, while waiting in line at the post office for example. Not one would think 'boy that looks hard' and let you go before them. Nope they stand there and judge you. LIKE YOU HAVE A CHOICE!

    Oh I'm sorry, is my child offending you. Shall I sit on him and make him scream instead?

    Since learning a lot about SPD and my son, I have been guilty of offering random children games on my android phone in waiting rooms because they're obviously driving their adult insane/ embarrassing them and I don't imagine that every child I harass has SPD but I just FEEL so much for the parents who are sitting there red faced, being judged and feeling helpless that I can't help but bug their kids (in a non creepy way of course).

    I'm trying to write a book directed at high school kids, to try and get a few such tales out there because I think that just as Autism is becoming an epidemic, so is lack of empathy

    And mrsc84 YES Go the seekers! I'm so freaking jealous of their boundless energy. I won't be surprised if my 4 year old ends up being a motorcycle stunt man or something. LOL dispite hardly talking at 3 years old he learnt to ride his bike without training wheels, which is IMO pretty freaking clever!

    I hope one day to foster kids, I hope I get seekers then too.


 

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