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  1. #31
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    May I please ask what plans you have in case of congenital abnormality? Say, for example an abdominal wall defect? They are rare, but I've looked after dozens of babies with one, and it's care of the exposed gut in the immediate post-natal period that make the difference between a baby with a working gut and one without. [wrap gladwrap round their middle and call and ambulance is probably the best thing to do]. A baby with something like a diaphragmatic hernia, 1 in 2,500 births, or PPHN, 1 in 2000 births, simply wouldn't survive, and although 1 in 100 babies are born with a congenital heart defect, not all are picked up antenatally anyhow, but there are a number of congenital issues where being aware of the possibility might make a difference in the unlikely event of giving birth to a baby with a problem.

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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by Singlepregnantchick View Post
    May I please ask what plans you have in case of congenital abnormality? Say, for example an abdominal wall defect? They are rare, but I've looked after dozens of babies with one, and it's care of the exposed gut in the immediate post-natal period that make the difference between a baby with a working gut and one without. [wrap gladwrap round their middle and call and ambulance is probably the best thing to do]. A baby with something like a diaphragmatic hernia, 1 in 2,500 births, or PPHN, 1 in 2000 births, simply wouldn't survive, and although 1 in 100 babies are born with a congenital heart defect, not all are picked up antenatally anyhow, but there are a number of congenital issues where being aware of the possibility might make a difference in the unlikely event of giving birth to a baby with a problem.
    Probably the same thing you would do in any other emergency it's not like people get in their cars everyday with an ambulance driving around behind them JIC. There's a fav saying I love...

    Birth is as safe as life gets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    I was considering a late pregnancy scan to ensure my good 'ol placenta is in a good position... and I think that's about it. I can't really think of anything else a scan would tell me, that I need to know. So now I'm not too sure an ultrasound is worth it.
    I'm not sure if you're still interested cause I see this post was a while back but I would just like to point out that scans can yield an enormous amount of important information. Not just the placenta but mainly if bubby has any problems such as a congenital heart defect, abdominal wall defect, kidney dilation, any artresias etc that would be critically important on birth. Thermo you said you'd treat it like any other emergency but this would not be enough - for example if bubby has a serious cardiac defect they could die on birth whereas if it's known about their life can easily be saved. I realise this situation is very rare etc and you are free to do what you wish but I just couldn't not reply to this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    BtB an IM worth anything will be able to detect the location of the placenta using a stethoscope no need for an ultrasound or dopler.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lillynix View Post
    However a good Midwife (or Ob) should be able to pinpoint placenta position by palpation and doppler/pinnard/stethoscope. My IM just wasn't sure of her abilities to do this as she is a little hard of hearing
    I totally disagree with this. It is impossible to know the position of a placenta like this. Even if they can detect vaguely where it is (which is possible) how the heck do they know there is not a lip or lingula overlying the cervical os??

    Thermo - yay our differences in opinion have surfaced again hahaha. Birth is not safe. Before medical interventions 1 out of 8 women died in childbirth.
    Last edited by Piffle; 24-12-2010 at 11:43. Reason: typo

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    I love that in a thread specifically for women to support each other with their choice to freebirth &/or have an unassisted pregnancy, that there are people who see fit to criticise their choices.
    Women need to protect each other from the harm they may cause themselves and their babies by birthing in the way they feel is safest.
    (PLEASE NOTE THE OBVIOUS SARCASM THERE )

    Kymmy and BorntoBe, it is so lovely to read about your journeys. Please to continue updating this thread.

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    MrsDJ - I am not criticising anyone's "journey" or decisions. I don't particularly care what other people choose to do, it's not my place. Go BornToBe and her choice of freebirth! I just don't like incorrect information being out there for other impressionable people to read.

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    I was just coming in to ask the same thing as Emy and SPC.... what happens in the case of congenital abnormalities? I'm totally not having a go at you, I think free pregnancy and freebirth sounds so wonderful, and if I was to have another bub I would consider it, but I personally would probably opt for a short u/s to check for any abnormalities, so that if there are any life threatening problems, I would be prepared for it at birth, in hospital if need be. I think I'm probably worried about this because I have a close friend who had a bubby with major heart defects, it was picked up at her u/s, baby was whisked away at birth to go to NICU and operated on soon after to save her life. She would not have survived if she was born at home.

    Anyway I know these things are rare and I'm not trying to change your mind or scare you, I was just curious as to how you weighed up the risks of u/s vs no u/s.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmyN View Post
    MrsDJ - I am not criticising anyone's "journey" or decisions. I don't particularly care what other people choose to do, it's not my place. Go BornToBe and her choice of freebirth! I just don't like incorrect information being out there for other impressionable people to read.
    Your info and experiences may be different from others, most women who chose to go the freebirth/unassisted route are extremely knowledgeable on all sorts of issues that can arise in pregnancy and during birth and how they would manage it if it were to arise. So to you it may be incorrect, to them they may feel they are making an INFORMED decision.

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    Quote Originally Posted by V8 View Post
    Your info and experiences may be different from others, most women who chose to go the freebirth/unassisted route are extremely knowledgeable on all sorts of issues that can arise in pregnancy and during birth and how they would manage it if it were to arise. So to you it may be incorrect, to them they may feel they are making an INFORMED decision.
    I know they are making an informed decision based on their info etc and we all have different experiences. I just don't want a new mumma-to-be reading that ultrasounds are useless apart from detecting placentas, and that placentas can be detected by stethoscopes because that IS wrong, and I can see no room to move on that. I am happy to agree to disagree.

    P.S. Another point even if you believe placenta praevia can be deteced that way, placenta accreta certainly can't be. Once again rare etc, but I just want to make the point.

    Merry Christmas everyone!!

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    EmyN - but placenta previa gives OTHER signs, like bleeding, it's not just picked up on US. Many people, myself included, trust in their bodies and know when something isn't right.

    I wasn't having a totally free pregnancy, but I was planning to freebirth at home with a Doula and my husband. I had bleeding, went to hospital, turns out it is placenta previa.

    Free pregnancy and free birth CAN be safe and as long as women trust in their bodies to show them when something isn't right then it is safe. There is always the option to have their fears investigated further if they are worried about something, but pregnancy and birth don't have to be medical.

  10. #40
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by elleandbump View Post
    EmyN - but placenta previa gives OTHER signs, like bleeding, it's not just picked up on US. Many people, myself included, trust in their bodies and know when something isn't right.

    I wasn't having a totally free pregnancy, but I was planning to freebirth at home with a Doula and my husband. I had bleeding, went to hospital, turns out it is placenta previa.

    Free pregnancy and free birth CAN be safe and as long as women trust in their bodies to show them when something isn't right then it is safe. There is always the option to have their fears investigated further if they are worried about something, but pregnancy and birth don't have to be medical.
    This, thanks e&b for saving me typing a long reply from my phone.

    I'm sorry it hurts BF but that's how I feel about birth. Some babies and women die it's a fact of life and yes, I have had friends lose babies during birth.

    I can't remember who said you can't detect the location of the placenta with a doppler but you can, you need experience yes, but it can be done.

    1 out of 8 babies or women? I can't remember what was said, but that is a load of ****, maybe when birth became something people thought they had to 'do' something about yes, but there are a few studies done in tribes by OBs that show no deaths in birth for the period of time they were observed (2yrs from memory).


 
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