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  1. #1
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    Default is workers compo worth it?

    Dp has got tennis elbow in both arms due to working in a factory. We know its from work as he hasnt been able to afford to play sport for over 18 months.
    He is in pain 24/7 and tried anti inflammitries, which didnt work.
    At the moment is having cortisone injections each week in his elbows, and even they arent helping...yet.
    While googling tonight for other help for his arms we came across alot of websites about workers comp for tennis elbow.
    Not knowing anything about it, is it worth it?
    Does it take alot of forms, time, for little money?
    does it really p** the boss off?
    Does it affect the boss?
    thanks any info would be great

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    i think my DH was on workers comp for a torn ligament he sustained when at work. For him it just meant he could go to the doctors/physio in company time and the company paid for all medical costs associated with it (or workers comp did), whichever one. The boss was never ****ed off...that is what it is there for! his boss was really great about it, even took him to some physio appointments if it was during his work time, as it was hard for him to drive!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Me View Post
    That's why employers have workers comp insurance. It's a bill we pay each year just like rego on a car or business name renewals. It's there to help ensure that the worker can get the treatment they require, not need to be out of pocket with lost wages and that the employer doesn't need to be out of pocket paying wages for someone who is unable to work plus their replacement and also that the employer doesn't try to do the wrong thing by an employee who has been injured at work.

    I believe that workers comp covers his wage if he requires time off for treatment rehabilitation and the medical costs. A guy I used to work with was injured very badly in an accident at work, he was off work full time for over 12 months, then off part time for a further 12-18 months. Workers comp covered all his medical costs and his wages. They also oversaw his return to work as he was deemed fit to do particular tasks to ensure he wasn't pushed back into work too much too soon.
    well said and yep everything you mentioned is what happened with DH!

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    Hi,

    I have worked in Workers Comp for more than 10 years and what benefits you get and the attitude of the employer is variable.

    Each state has its own Workers Comp legislation and website where you can find out more info. If you want specific information about NSW Comp, I can help.

    In the case of NSW employers, unless the business is very small, their premium will go up as a result of your DH making a claim. The more money paid out on the claim, the more the premium will rise.

    In my experience, employers are generally pretty good about it, especially if they already think that your DH is a good worker. They tend to get a little less sympathetic if people stay off work for months and months.

    The treatment he is having sounds pretty expensive so I think it would be worthwhile putting in a claim. If you can get a letter from the GP or specialist supporting the work relatedness of the condition, that would be really helpful for the insurance company. Your word will prbably not be good enough, they will want a doctor's opinion. Your DH will also need to get a Workers Comp medical certificate from his GP and hand that in to work. They should also reimburse any out of pocket expenses already incurred in terms of treatment.

    The link for WorkCover NSW is:
    http://www.workcover.nsw.gov.au/Pages/default.aspx

    Good luck.

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    If he is in severe pain and needs ongoing treatment, then yes it is certainly worth making a claim.

    If the injury involves only a couple of physio appointments or the like, then if I were him I would talk to the boss about coming to an agreement without involving workers comp.

    The reason is that if you do claim, any time you ever go for another job, you have to disclose that you have claimed workers comp and all of the details.

    Its not terrible or anything ... but its not something I would do for a minor injury.

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    See we arent out of pocket much. Dps GP bulk bills and he can see him after work as dp finnishes at 3.30pm.
    The needles are $5.40 for 5 as we are on a low income health care card. He has been in agony since the last needle, while it isnt affecting him much now,(except for being grumpy because of the pain lol) (well he has had the last 2 days off, because of that combinded with the flu), it may further down the track. do we leave it to it gets worse?
    We are in QLD

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    In that case, I would write a letter to your employer detailing the injury and your course of action (ie going to doctor, what dr is saying etc) ...

    and just say that you are dealing with it at the moment, and will keep them informed so that in the future if he needs further treatment you can discuss workers compensation and insurance.

    That way, if in future he needs treatment, it is on the record that it is a work related injury and acknowledged as such by your employer.


    You dont want to be in a situation of needing expensive treatment in 12 months time and the insurance company saying 'oh we dont want to pay' ....

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    Quote Originally Posted by KatiesMum View Post
    If he is in severe pain and needs ongoing treatment, then yes it is certainly worth making a claim.

    If the injury involves only a couple of physio appointments or the like, then if I were him I would talk to the boss about coming to an agreement without involving workers comp.

    The reason is that if you do claim, any time you ever go for another job, you have to disclose that you have claimed workers comp and all of the details.

    Its not terrible or anything ... but its not something I would do for a minor injury.
    The point made above that you have to disclose that you have claimed workers comp is fictitious. I looked into this myself when I applied for workers comp last year when the boss threw a bin at my head! I was going down the stress route (this was not the only incident) which is the hardest to prove and get workers compensation for. I was declined even though the boss admitted everything he had done but they got away with it saying it was for my professional development. So I quit! I would avoid workers compensation like the plague, you need a lot of evidence to support the injury occurred at work and they investigate like you wouldn't believe and bring up all sorts of things so they don't have to pay (I was stressed not because I was scared the boss would throw a bin at my head but according the workers compensation report because I had 2 children and I wasn't a fit mother!) You can see why I will never again go for workers compensation. I think it would be easier for an actual physical condition, but only if you can definitely prove it was from work. With tennis elbow I wouldn't be surprised if some pchycologist would give some excuse like he had to change nappies so probably got it from that! Seriously, yes people do pay premiums to cover themselves but they are to support the larger company not the individual.

    But as for having to bring it up in your next job, you definitely do not. These days they're not even allowed to ask those kind of questions due to laws regarding discrimination. You can by law not divulge such information and if a future employer pressures you for such information you only have to bring up the discrimination act and they should back down. Technically age, sex, race, sexual orientation, workers compensation, it's better they don't know so you can't come back and say you were discriminated against because of blah, blah, blah.

    Summing up, only go down the workers comp road if you can 100% prove the injury came from work. If there's any doubt at all, or if they could possibly come up with another excuse (ie if your dh played tennis for the past 10 years I wouldn't bother), they will use what they can against you.

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    You have an entitlement to workers comp, and the process really is not that onerous, a few forms which your hubbys GP can help with.

    I agree with the posted who said it might be worth speaking with your employer - they should have to log the 'incident' and that way, if you do choose to continue to deal with it, you will find it much simpler to log a claim if things were to get worse in future.

    Have a look around www.qcomp.com.au

    You may be ok now, but where the worker's comp claim will really help is if your hubby finds he can't work due to pain at any point. If you think this is a possibility, I'd claim.

    I've worked in worker's comp for 6.5 years.

    Good luck

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    You only have to disclose a workers comp claim to a new employer if you are still claiming, or the injury may have an impact on your ability to do the job with them.

    I am not sure but it might against HR law now to ask that question on an application.

    Sorry I have no real advice, but if you think it might be something that he will take a long time to recover from/get worse then you really need to look into claiming, or speak to his employer about the possibility of him changing tasks so as to not make it worse

    Good luck, I hope he finds treatment that helps him soon


 

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