Twin Genetics - ID/frat, Are you a chance of having twins etc | Page 2 | Bub Hub
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  1. #11
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    bgbgbb is offline To think, I was only going to have 1 child!
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    Krystal, was referring to mono twins in general, alhough yes, same sac same placenta are called MoMo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kiki07 View Post
    I have seen you quote this before. Are you referring to one egg being fertilised by 2 sperm and then splitting?

    If not, how do you get one male and one female bub from one egg and one sperm? The sperm would be either male (contains Y chromosome) or female (contain X chromosome).
    Actually it's due to a condition named Turners Syndrome where one of the babies drops a chromosome and it's extremely rare


    In our case we have b/g frats. I have a maternal history of frats and was 37 when they were conceived so we pretty much covered all bases

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleDelight View Post
    Actually it's due to a condition named Turners Syndrome where one of the babies drops a chromosome and it's extremely rare
    OK, i get it. The egg would be fertilised by the sperm (with a full set of chromosomes including a Y). Very early this splits and in the process one of the fetus 'loses' their Y chromosome so only has one sex chromosome, an X (XO).

    I had wondered about that for awhile. Thanks!

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    There is also an option where the egg can split before it fertilised. Just to throw another one out there.

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    this vid link talk about the mz G/B twin thing...

    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/149415...omb_multiples/

    GREAT doco if any one is interested!


    Funny thinking about the 'is it in the family' thing - you'd think if it was sucha prominent gene factor that it would happen with 'most' of the women from the family - not just one here or there - skipping generations etc.

    Most pregnancies (I think it is 50% or something) start out as twin pregnancies...but usually before the first ultra sound, so very early - sometimes later though... one of them is absorbed by the other fetus, the placenta or the mother ...or 'vanishes'.
    So it's like 1 in 8 people started life in the womb as a 'twin'.


    two seperate eggs can be released and fertilized days apart...

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    Great idea for a thread Nomsie!

    There are alot of people out there that are misinformed and think that because twins have separate placentas and sacks then they are definitely fraternal. So not the case, like bgbgbb said it depends on when the egg splits.

    There have also been cases out there of women doing IVF, having one embryo put back and having fraternal twins, because the woman releases an egg and it is fertilised in the "normal" way by her partner.

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    Friends of ours had one fertilised egg/emby put in but got triplets - the ivf assisted egg split and she then still ovulated and the third baby was about 3 weeks younger than her twin sisters

    The mother only had one tube and it was badly blocked and damaged - the human body is amazing sometimes

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    Quote Originally Posted by WorkingClassMum View Post
    Friends of ours had one fertilised egg/emby put in but got triplets - the ivf assisted egg split and she then still ovulated and the third baby was about 3 weeks younger than her twin sisters
    That's another sort of twins called superfetation, when although the mother has conceived she still ovuates a few weeks later (usually ovulation is surpressed when a pregnancy establishes) and the resulting 'twins' are a few weeks or even a month or so apart in age. Quite a few years ago an Aussie IVF mother had 3 embryos put back then she double ovulated and ended up with fraternal quints!

    Another fascinating, but rare, instance with twins is superfecundation, when a mother has sex with multiple men around the time of ovulation and different sperm fertilise different eggs. The only way they usually can test for this is with dna testing, and when its obvious, such as when a mixed race baby is born whilst its twin is not mixed (and neither are the parents).
    Last edited by bgbgbb; 28-05-2010 at 13:07.

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    Just thought I would add a quick update here-
    Earlier in the thread I mentioned my twins were monochoronic diamniotic- one placenta, 2 sacs, and that it was thought there was an 80% chance they were monozygotic, or identical as the general population calls it.

    I still haven't gone down the genetic testing path- I see no need at this stage- but since we are on the Australian Twins Registry, if a test comes up in future where it were offered we could have them tested for free I may consider it.

    Anyway, my point to this ramble () was that now my boys have grown out their little baby stage, and are now little boys. (Still classed as toddlers I guess at nearly 27 months?, but still complete little boys nonetheless) They have started to grow into their features and develop into real little characters. Strangers have varied opinions on their looks- some say they look nothing alike, and others say they can't tell them apart.
    My mother was saying the other day that L was looking a lot like B with his facial expressions and stances just last week, and I'll be honest- sometimes when I'm not fully focuses I do get them mixed up.

    My point being, I still don't know whether to belive whether they're monozygotic or dizygotic anymore! I used to believe when they were babies 100% that they were mono (ID) but I suppose as I mentioned earlier in the thread that even mono babies can grow up into quite seperate looking people. And I guess that given that they're both happy and healthy looking children, that it doesn't really matter in the end. (Although I am STILL curious, since I either had an egg split or hyper-ovulated and would love to know which! )

    Yep- pointless post really.. just wanted to share my most recent thoughts on the subject!

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    Nomsie, your post made me smile! I have a friend who has certified identical twin girls and yet at first I thought they were fraternal as although they look alike, they are still not totally the same. Whereas another friend had the two placentas/ two sacs and her girls are so alike its bizarre.

    My twinnies had a fused placenta and so the medical staff were not sure for the first few days if they were identical or not as they looked the same, but now one is blonde and slim, the other is dark haired and slightly rounder and look nothing alike, other than their heights!

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