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  1. #1
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    Default Infant Sleep Apnea

    Hi,

    My 10 weeks old son has sleep apnea. He has shown some mild signs since he was very young but I did not recognise them as a problem.

    Now he stops breathing up to 15 times a night, and each attack can last over a minute. I have a breathing monitor on him, which alerted me to his attacks, but the loud beeping does not startle him into breathing anymore. At first he would hold his breath, and then start breathing again himself. Then I had to start rubbing his chest to get him to start, now I have to shake his little chest and move his arms and legs vigorously to get him to start. I have taken him to 2 doctors, the first one told me it was normal, the second told me she had never heard of sleep apnea in babies. (Google it, you will find it is a common and very serious problem) I am now going to take him to another doctor, and demand help. I am sick of being treated like its not an issue!!!! I am not a drama queen.

    Is there anyone out there who has had experience with sleep apnea in their babies/children? Does anyone know what was the cause or what can help or what did they do to get help? the more info I am armed with, the better I can put it forward to the doctor so he can take me seriously!

    Can anyone help?

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    wow thats insane! i would be calling an ambulance next time it happens because that is not normal!

    Evelyn is on medications for irregular heart beat and seizures, and a side effect of these is that when in a deep sleep her heart rate drops below 60bpm and her breathing rate drops to less than 20 breaths a minute. we only know this because it happened a couple of times when she was in hospital for observation (due to seizures) and she took a good 30 secs of sitmulation to wake up and start breathing properly.

    but she is no where near as bad as ur lil one by the sounds of it.

  3. #3
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    My DS had sleep apnoea from 10 months - 26 months when he finally had his tonsils and adenoids out. His OSA was caused by grade 4 enlarged tonsils and adenoids.

    You need to go to your GP and demand a referral to a paediatric sleep and respiratory physician. If you're in Perth, the best one is Dr Veena Judge. Not sure who the appropriate person is anywhere else.

    Until that happens, you need to sleep with your baby. Your presence can assist baby not to go into as deep a sleep so he will rouse himself from the episodes naturally. And if he doesn't at least you are on hand to stimulate him should he need help. If you don't want him in bed with you, look at side caring his cot to your bed (google "cot side car" for instructions). Keeping the alarm on the cot if he is in a side car set up is a good idea.

    All the best

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    Zoe, I really didn't know whether to reply to you as I don't want to alarm you. However, if you haven't already, do as the above poster said and demand a referral to a paediatrician. They will no doubt refer your baby for a sleep study. I noticed my first daughter had sleep apnoea and no one (doctor, child nurse or MIL) took me seriously. I was assured 'all babies stop breathing', 'as long as she doesn't turn blue' etc. My baby died at twelve weeks old. They put it down to SIDS, but I know it was the sleep apnoea, coupled with being congested from a cold that was the cause. I know this because I noticed the same in my third daughter. I even videotaped her apnoeaic episodes in case they didn't believe me. She also had a monitor that would go off many times a night. I was taken seriously this time, she was given a sleep study. It was found she had both central and obstructive sleep apnoea and was immediately put on medication (theophline back then, but now they use caffeine). The alarm never went off after that. I now have a 13 week old and she will also have a sleep study, although I'm sure she doesn't have apnoea (am still paranoid though). My first daughter would have turned 17 last Thursday, and I believe would still be here if my concerns were taken seriously. I really hate to cause additional worry for you, but I wish someone had have said something to me. I'm sure there are many babies that have sleep apnoea and don't succumb to SIDS, however it should still be diagnosed and treated, and is easily done so. Even though my 13 week old doesn't have apnoea, I still use monitors (a respisense during the day and a hisense for night). I am also careful to follow the SIDS guidelines to a T. All the best to you xx

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    Hey there my 4 year old DD has apnea we picked it up at first with a matres moniter adn then she was put on a hospital cyrometrics moniter its an events link moniter so it records any apneas or high or low HR and 30 minues prior and post each event.

    Are you in WA if so ask for a referal to the sids monitering clinic at PMH they supply the proper moniter either the events linmk or a grasby apnea moniter, If you cant get into teh, get a referal for Dr Jacki scurlocks private clinic, She is THE expert on sleep apnea.

    If you are any where else in aus, i dont now who would be the best persopn to see but I would think each hospital has a monitering clinic, If you cant get into somewhere ASAP take bubs to the ED.

    What are you having to do to make bubs breath each time if you are having to perform resus then you should cal an ambo. If is definately full apneas and not just shalopw breathing sometimes them home moniters can miss breaths.

    HUGS

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    DaughteroftheForest is offline Sometimes you have to forget what you want in order to remember what you deserve
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    Go to another GP, and another and another and another until you find someone who is going to take you seriously. Video tape it, document it. Get a referral from a GP to a good pead and take it from there.

    This is my experience:
    My son had sleep apnea from infancy. I co-slept since day one and his sleep specialist is certain this is what saved his life. He'd always snored and I just thought that was normal He was my first and I raised him alone so I had no one to point out that it wasn't. When he was about 6 months I started noticing that he'd wake himself up by snorting loudly (It was him desperately taking an intake of breath through his blocked throat) He had always slept terribly so I took him to my GP. She told me he snored because his tonsils were too big and 'like a puppy with big feet, he'll grow into them'. I took him to 5 more GP's over the course of the next 18 months. I video taped his episodes where he would stop breathing for as long as a minute. One of the GP's told me it was cute that he snored . Eventually I found one who took me seriously when my son was 2. He referred us to Billy Tao, a well known pead in Adelaide.He took one look at the tape and referred us to Dr Martin who is freaking awesome! He was put in for a sleep study within days and then put on CPAP ( a mask that forces air into his system). He was on that for 4 months, the worst 4 months of my life as he would wake up screaming at least 10 times a night and I would have to get him back to sleep before putting the mask back on. Finally, just after he turned three he had surgery to remove his adenoids and tonsils. That went great and he went from a crazy, sleep deprived little hurricane to my gorgeous, thoughtful, well behaved little man *phew* I also went from his cranky, dead on her feet mum, to his gorgeous, thoughtful, well behaved Mummy He's 5 now and still sleeps with his head thrown right back. His x-rays show that there has been some re-growth of his adenoids and he may need a second surgery. But for now he's okay

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    omg, what a thread. I'm sure there is something up with my 5yo daughter. she arches her back alot in her sleep and sleeps in positions that seem to allow her throat to open better, which i understand might be a symptom of apnea. she has a real nasaly quality to her voice that people notice about her. she snores, but not all the time. sounds like something i need to get onto.

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    wondering if people still check this thread. but we have had 3 hospital admissions over 2 weeks due to my 12 week old girl stopping breathing at night. she is on a Grasby monitor currently has had 2 ecg's one eeg, 3 urine tests, 2 blood tests a chest xray and we still dont know what is wrong. currently waiting on eeg results as they are suspecting seizures.. im scared to sleep at night as i dfont trust her monitor, the first one of these episodes left her white and blue..i dont know what else i can do...

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    We found DD's Graseby monitor was more responsive the closer to her belly button it was, not sure if that is helpful to you at all. We also went through cords frequently as the alarm would sound over nothing at times, then not sound at all.

    Have you had a sleep study done?


 

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